Tag: philosophy

Loneliness and Revelation, by Brendan Myers

By Psyche | June 22, 2011 | Leave a comment

Loneliness and Revelation, by Brendan MyersLoneliness and Revelation: A Study of the Sacred, by Brendan Myers
O-Books, 9781846943553, 165 pp. (incl. bibliography), 2010

Loneliness and Revelation is comprised of forty-five thought provoking meditations on loneliness; Myers takes a close look at what it is and what it means for the individual as an existential condition.

More than just solitude or isolation, loneliness gives rise to the thought that one’s life may be “utterly insignificant and meaningless“. We combat this through what Myers calls Revelation, ways of being in the world and asserting our presence here, both for ourselves and those around us.

He explores this theme through various friends, philosophers, world religions both major and minor, referencing myth and literature. In doing so, he surveys the various ways we stave off loneliness, while noting that loneliness is something we return to again and again. Continue reading


Feminine Mysteries of the Bible, by Ruth Rusca

By Mike Gleason | September 24, 2010 | Leave a comment

Feminine Mysteries in the Bible: The Soul Teachings of the Daughters of the Goddess, by Ruth Rusca
Bear & Company, 9781591430889, 144 pp., 2008

Rusca approaches the feminism in the Bible from a somewhat unique perspective. Born in Switzerland in 1929 to German Protestant parents who lived in an Italian-speaking Catholic village, she received a religious education which encompassed both cultures. Add to that mixture an appreciation of the work of Carl Jung and you have the makings of a unique approach.

She has found a four-fold path of women as both mothers and daughters. She sees them as embodying the aspects of sacred sexuality without, necessarily, approaching the concept of the Mother Goddess as it is currently conceived by modern neo-Pagans. Continue reading


Aleister Crowley, by John Moore

By Psyche | February 12, 2010 | 1 comment

Aleister Crowley: A Modern Master, by John Moore
Mandrake of Oxford, 97801906958002, 215 pp. (incl. bibliography and index), 2009

A Modern Master aims to present itself as a cultural examination of Crowley, yet Moore does not seem quite up to the task.

Moore wries that one of his goals in writing this book was “to make excuses for him, defending what has been criticised as a more contemptible side of his character”. This is severely misguided. Crowley was who he was, excuses are rather moot at this point. (Do we excuse Baudelaire? Rimbaud? Berber?) Rather than attempt to shine up the unsavoury bits Moore would have done better to explore them in context and describe how they influenced his work.

Continuing, he writes: Continue reading


Initiation in the Aeon of the Child, by J. Daniel Gunther

By Gesigewigu's | July 11, 2009 | Leave a comment

Initiation in the Aeon of the Child: The Inward Journey, by J. Daniel Gunther
Ibis Press, 0892541458, 224 pp., 2009

In 1904, Aleister Crowley become the Prophet of the New Aeon, declaring the Aeon of Horus, the Child is dawning and that the worlds, inner and outer must change and reflect this. Gunther follows this belief and a century later begins to explore what the Aeon of the Child is all about.

James Wasserman says in the introduction “In my opinion, this is the most important original work to be published since the death of Aleister Crowley. This builds either a high degree of expectation or scepticism, or perhaps both. Continue reading


The Universe in a Single Atom, by the Dalai Lama

By Gesigewigu's | June 23, 2009 | Leave a comment

The Universe in a Single Atom: The Convergence of Science and Spirituality, by H.H. Tenzin Gyasto, the 14th Dalai Lama
Broadway Books, 978767920810, 216 pp., 2005

Many books that touch on science and spirituality follow the pattern of using one to try to (dis)prove the other. In this book, while His Holiness seeks the middle path of Science and Spirituality, he doesn’t try to marry the results, but the process. Rather than trying to show how science is directly supporting or opposing Buddhist thought, he spends the time focused on the process of science and the importance it holds to Buddhism, as well as how Buddhism must change with the understanding of our world.

“My confidence in venturing into science lies in my basic belief that as in science so in Buddhism, understanding the nature of reality is pursued by means of critical investigation: if scientific analysis were conclusively to demonstrate certain claims in Buddhism to be false, then we must accept the finds of science and abandon those claims.”

His Holiness so believes Continue reading


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