All posts by Psyche

About Psyche

Psyche is the editor of Spiral Nature, and has been published in numerous journals, including The Cauldron, PanGaia, and Witches & Pagans. Psyche is on Twitter as @plutopsyche, and on Tumblr as plutopsyche.

The Fountain Tarot

By | Leave a comment

Detail from the Knight of Wands, from The Fountain TarotThe Fountain TarotThe Fountain Tarot, created by Jonathan Saiz, written by Jason Gruhl, and designed by Andi Todaro The Fountain Tarot, 79 cards, 112 pp. booklet, 2015The Fountain Tarot comes in an attractive shiny box, and the cards themselves have silver-gilt edges. Illustrated in a prismatic rainbow of pastels, the finish is matte rather than glossy, which allows the delicate detail of the original oil paintings to emerge. The cards are illustrated in a beautiful reinterpretation of Pamela Colman Smith’s artwork in the Rider Tarot, integrated with the sacred geometry that influenced Lady Frieda Harris in her illustrations for the Thoth Tarot, which ultimately gives it a more contemporary feel.As with many decks published these days, The Fountain Tarot comes with 79 cards, consisting of the traditional 78-cards plus a bonus card. The extra card is called the Fountain, and is unnumbered, bearing instead a lemniscate representing infinity. The card itself represents the “eternal context beyond human experience in which anything and everything can happen.” Further, it’s a card of spirit, “the aether in which we navigate our imperfect lives and the substance of life itself.” Read More

Under the Roses Lenormand

By | Leave a comment

Under the Roses Lenormand, by Kendra Hurteau and Katrina HillUnder the Roses Lenormand, by Kendra Hurteau and Katrina HillUnder the Roses Lenormand, by Kendra Hurteau and Katrina Hill U.S. Games Systems, Inc., 9781572817609, 39 cards, 55 pp. booklet, 2014It’s only in the past few months that I’ve begun to play with Lenormand oracles, and it’s been a challenge to locate a design that I connect with, but I think I’ve finally found it with Under the Roses Lenormand. It’s illustrated with a subdued pallet, and the backgrounds are sepia toned, which allows the primary colours of the symbols to really pop. It has a kind of Victorian nostalgic feel that I really enjoy.The Lenormand oracle is named after Marie Anne Le Normand, a 19th century French  celebrity fortune teller. Though she never used the cards herself, she did popularize cartomancy and fortune telling in general. This deck also takes its name from sub rosa, a Latin metaphor meaning “under the rose” that refers to buried secrets -- an apt name for a divination deck. Read More

Prisma Visions Tarot

By | Leave a comment

Prisma Visions Tarot, by James R. EadsPrisma Visions Tarot, by James R. EadsPrisma Visions Tarot, illustrated by James R. Eads, written by Katherine Tombs James R. Eads, 79 cards, 96 pp. booklet, 2015There have been a number of gorgeous self-published decks coming out in recent years, and the Prisma Visions Tarot ranks high amongst them. It comes packaged in a sturdy flip-top box, with 79 silver gilt-edged cards, and a small booklet outlining the deck’s symbolism and use.This is James R. Eads’ second tarot deck, following the Light Visions Tarot, which was produced in a limited edition of 500 copies, and has since sold out. Unlike his previous deck, the Prisma Visions Tarot is full colour, and is slated to be available indefinitely.The trump cards of the Prisma Visions Tarot are bordered, but for the four suits, each card carries on from the next, creating a panoramic landscape for each suit. The cards have an impressionist feel, and the backgrounds are predominantly dark blue, and give the impression that the scenes take place at night, with the exception of the dusky oranges and yellows of the Pentacles. Read More

Good Night Yoga, by Mariam Gates

By | 2 comments

Good Night Yoga, by Mariam GatesGood Night Yoga, by Mariam GatesGood Night Yoga: A Pose-by-Pose Bedtime Story, by Mariam Gates, illustrated by Sarah Jane Hinder Sounds True, 9781622034666, unpaginated, 2015Written for kids between the ages of 4-8, Good Night Yoga has sturdy pages that look like they can survive pawing from younger siblings as well.Gorgeously illustrated by Sarah Jane Hinder, the colours run from bright and sunshiney at the beginning of the book, and move into twilight and night colours by the end. The young yoginis and yogis that people the book are ethnically diverse, and the animals that accompany them look open and friendly.Mariam Gates gives a description of each of the poses illustrated, and short lyrics to focus on as each pose is enacted: "As I breath in, I bend my knees and scoop the clouds around me. As I breath out, I stand tall and release the clouds over my head." Read More

Letters: Are magical initiations necessary?

By | 8 comments

Spiral Nature Letters, Mailbox background by RaSeLaSeD - Il Penguino, with additional work by PsycheThis query came in via email, and it's one I receive quite a bit, in vary forms, so I was glad when the person who sent it said I could share it, and my response, on the site:

I have recently read your article entitled "Why I left OTO" and in the beginning of the post you described yourself as being already a magic practitioner for 15 years. Now, the paragraph made me infer that you have undergone some form of "self-initiation," learning the topics, theories, rituals, insights on your own and only later attempted to join a community, and this process of self-initiation is something I have been striving for for a few months now. Read More

Page 1 of 3712345...102030...Last »