Wicca

An ye harm none, do what ye will.

Dianism In A Nutshell

By Inanna Seastar | May 26, 2002 | Leave a comment

This is an article I wrote for PROTEAN SYNTHESIS, a semi-private newsletter after it was solicited by the editor.

Recently, I got back in touch with my teacher after nearly two years and dropped a couple of bombshells on her: I had changed gender identity and had come together with two other women to form a Dianic coven. When the initial shock wore off, Rita sent me a complete run of Protean Synthesis and a solicitation for this article.

Several years ago I subscribed to several stereotypes regarding “those peculiar Dianics”. They were thealogically unbalanced, they hated men, they denied that men had souls, they were all lesbians, they couldn’t spell (in the orthographic sense; no one has yet accused Dianics of inability to work magick), etc. etc. When I came together with my covensisters, I realized that these notions were at most partially true and some cases were patently false.

I believe there are only three valid generalizations that can be made about Dianics: 1) We are all feminists. 2) We all look to the Goddess(es) far more than to the God(s). 3) We are all eclectics. Note well that there are plenty of non-Dianic feminist Witches, non-Dianic eclectics, and non- Dianics who are primarily Goddess-oriented. There are also doubtless a good many feminist, Goddess-oriented eclectics who do not choose to call themselves Dianic. In my own case I use the “If it quacks like a duck, it probably is a duck” argument, as well as the fact that my HPS learned the Craft as a Dianic and runs Dianic rituals.

Some of the stereotypical generalizations I can dismiss out of hand. I don’t know of a single Dianic who denies that men have souls. Even Z Budapest doesn’t believe that piece of tripe anymore! It is true that Dianism is particularly attractive to separatists, and many separatists actually hate men. Many Dianics are lesbians. Some misspell words like “woman”, women”, “egalitarian”, and “holistic” on purpose. Not all fit these, however, and I think that Z Budapest in her younger, or spiritual bomb-throwing, days represents an extreme and a small minority. There are a number of males involved in Dianism, and some of those are men [NB: I use the terms "man" and "woman" to indicate gender identity, that is, how one's heart, mind, and/or soul are configured. I use "male" and "female" to indicate physical sex, that is, how one's plumbing is configured. I hope this dispels confusion.].

Thealogical and magickal imbalance is not so easily dismissed and needs to be addressed further, as that is the most valid objection that thoughtful Witches have to Dianism. The apparent imbalance comes from the Dianic emphasis on Goddess-worship, often to the complete exclusion of God-worship. This upsets many Witches’ sense of polarity balance. The resolution of this apparent imbalance lies in the consideration of other polarities than sexual and/or gender as the primary polarity. There are indeed many other polarities to consider: true-false, life-death, dark-light, rational- mystical, creation-destruction, order-chaos, and good-evil, to name but a few. One problem with the masculine-feminine polarity is that there is a strong tendency to express all other polarities in terms of it. The Chinese were particularly fond of this, and mapped everything they liked into the yang side, and everything they disliked or feared into the yin side, the patriarchal no-accounts!

One thing I have discovered is that if you look hard enough, you can find goddesses to fit both ends of most polarities. Some even occupy both ends simultaneously. Inanna, my matron goddess, is a good case in point. She is the Sumerian goddess of love, war, wisdom (which she won in a drinking bout!), adventure, the heavens, the earth, and even of death (in the guise of her dark aspect, Ereshkigal). A very busy lady indeed is Inanna. At this point it becomes largely a matter of personal preference rather than of polarity, whether one chooses a god or a goddess to occupy a particular place in a ritual.

No Dianic I know of denies the existence of the God. Indeed, He gets mentioned as the consort of the Goddess with some frequency in Z Budapest’s HOLY BOOK OF WOMEN’S MYSTERIES, which is close a thing as there is to a Dianic version of the Gardnerian Book of Shadows. He is there, and sometimes we will invoke Him, when it is appropriate. He makes His own path, and we follow our own, and when they cross naturally we honor Him and do not avoid Him. We also do not force the paths to cross simply to lend an artificial balance to a ritual where none is really needed.

Now that I have spilled a good deal of ink over what Dianism is not, I should now say a few words about what it is: a movement of feminist, eclectic, Goddess-oriented Witches.

Feminism: This covers a vast multitude of virtues and sins. I do not think the stereotypical radical lesbian separatist is as common as is believed. Moderate to liberal feminism is probably far more common, even among Dianics. Certainly my own coven contains no separatists! There are too many nice men out there, even though surveys have shown that 70% or more of all men are potential rapists. The nice ones are found among those who are not in that repulsive majority; you just have to look to find them. One of the places you might find such nice men is in Dianic covens! Some are mixed groups, at least some of those of the branch founded by Morgan McFarland. My own is something of a mixed up group, I suppose. While we do not currently have any men in the coven, two of the three of us were born male and still have original-equipment plumbing. The Goddess and our HPS accept us unreservedly as women.

Eclecticism: If there is one dictum of Z Budapest’s that bears repeating to everyone in the Craft, and which gets followed by many, it is “When in doubt, invent.” Dianics tend toward creative ritual, drawing from any and all possible sources. I have yet to see a Dianic equivalent of the Gardnerian Book of Shadows, nor do I ever hope to see one.

Goddess Orientation: I’ve discussed this at some length while talking about polarity. There are some wags who have said that Dianics are nothing but matriarchal monotheists. I tell you three times: The Dianic Goddess is NOT Jehovah in drag! The Dianic Goddess is NOT Jehovah in drag! The Dianic Goddess is NOT Jehovah in drag! A much closer analogy would be that Dianics have taken the Classical pantheon and reclaimed most of the roles. This, too, is oversimplifying, but it is not nearly as wide of the mark as the usual criticism. At some point I may write up a long exegesis on the Dianic Goddess, but not here. My own personal involvement with Her comes from a great feeling of comfort I do not find elsewhere. She feels right. I have a great deal of difficulty accepting known rapists (most of the Olympian males are this, especially Zeus, Hades, and Pan!) into my personal pantheon. I also feel a personal vocation from the Mother; it is rather incongruous to me to embrace a male deity wholeheartedly when the Goddess comes to me and calls me Her daughter. This goes doubled, redoubled, in pentacles, and vulnerable for lovers of women.

I hope this little discussion of Dianism-in-a-Nuitshell has proved enlightening to you. It is not a path for everyone, but it is a valid path for some, and in considering it I hope that you can now ignore the garbage that has been put forth in the past as “data” regarding it.

Inanna Seastar
Birdsnest Coven


The Coven

By Julia Phillips | September 9, 2001 | Leave a comment

Greetings All!

This article was written by me several years ago, but I thought it might be of interest here, as it discusses several issues relevant to modern Witches. Any thought or feedback most welcome! Please remember, that although the historical stuff is pretty general, the other parts of the article are my own ideas, and not necessarily applicable outside of my own tradition:)

Covens and Witches

In 1662, Isobel Gowdie of Auldearne made four separate confessions of being a Witch, and in the process, gave the word “Coven” to the world. Although there is no other historical evidence for this word, it has proved to be one of the most lasting facets of Witchcraft – ask anyone today what Witches do, and the answer will almost certainly include the fact that they meet in groups, called “Covens”.

So given that a number of modern Witches do, in fact, either run, or belong to, a Coven – just what is its purpose in 20th (and 21st) century Western Civilization? Why has this word of such dubious historical veracity survived over three hundred years? Is there a place in our modern world for a social group which, as far as we know, occurred only in 17th century Scotland?

The very fact of its survival for over three hundred years argues that there is a place for such a group. In my own case, I have been a member of, and run, Covens of Witches for a number of years, and it is a social model which fits extremely well within modern society.

The structure of a coven varies, but generally has one or two leaders, and a number of members of varying levels of experience. In a sense, the modern Coven has replaced the tribal family, and its members often fulfil familial roles, which are no longer available to them in the family in which they were born.

Some researchers have commented that many modern Witches come from a background which was disrupted; i.e., did not provide a safe family environment during their formative years. As I know a great many Witches for whom this was not the case, I think this is only a partial reason, and only for some people.

Humanity itself seems to be inherently tribal; any common bond between people will generally result in the creation cults or sub-cultures, where those of a like-mind will bond together. They will evolve their own social order (generally hierarchical), have their own common language, and often are identifiable by their demeanour and appearance.

Witches gather together in Covens for very much the same sorts of reasons; we are apart from general society by virtue of our beliefs and practices. Meeting with others who think and feel similarly to ourselves gives us the opportunity to share ideas and skills, as well as being able to practice our Craft.

A modern Coven provides a family-style environment, where the “Elders” can, by virtue of their experience, give encouragement, support, and advice to those seek to learn about Witchcraft. As with all families, Covens have very unique and individual ways of approaching this. Just as no two families are the same, neither are any two Covens.

Some Covens are run by people with an academic bent, and as would be the case in any family, this characterizes the way in which their “children” are brought up. Other groups are oriented towards a more simple approach, and the oral traditions play an important role in the way in which the Coven is structured. Some combine the these two approaches, and the variations upon the basic themes are endless.

For any “family” to exist harmoniously, everyone within the group must feel a part of the group, and wish to learn and grow within that group environment. With a path such as Witchcraft, with its emphasis upon personal growth and development, it is likely that individuals who may at one time have been happy within their family group, will change, and wish to move away. This is a perfectly natural process, and the wise coven leaders will send those people off with their love and blessing. Trying to keep them would be like trying to keep your sons and daughters tied to your apron strings forever!

Ultimately, and despite the popularity of the word “coven”, I do believe that most Witches are solitary in nature, and will generally spend at least part of their lives without being a member of, or running, a coven. I think the inward exploration during these periods is vital to self-development, just as we believe it is important to encourage social-awareness in children. However, I also believe that at some stage it is important to learn the practices of Witchcraft from another person; to be an apprentice, if you will; because the act of passing knowledge from one person to another cannot be replicated by books, correspondence courses, or be self-taught. This may seem an almost impossible task to some people, but as all the magical traditions teach: when the student is ready, the teacher will appear! What’s more, it’s true!

B*B Julia


Coven Warning

By Seamus | February 7, 2001 | Leave a comment

Listen up kiddies, ’cause this is serious. Being a teenage witch, I can relate to many problems that are being discovered by the many younger members of our religion. I know that as teenagers, we are indeed very inquisitive and very social people. This is absolutely normal for human beings, and we are expected to be this way.

If a teenager is practicing Witchcraft, a religion that is still being frowned upon and persecuted in too many parts of the nation, he or she may feel an extra sense of isolation. Along with the usual feelings of rejection, fear, inequality, low self-esteem, and various other emotional problems that afflict today’s teens, this can be a real kicker. A teenagermay want to seek out people who share their beliefs or interests. This is completely normal, for it is how we chose our friends during those formidable high school years and beyond, but when it involves an alternative religion, one must tread lightly.

This is especially the case with today’s laws. If you’re not 18, anyone over the age of 18 who is discovered to be instructing you in any religious path of which your parents do not approve, can be held legally responsible for “influencing” you against your parents will. So many adult covens, ones with some real experience and lots of real knowledge to share, will usually prefer not to aid you until you are of legal age. It’s a horrible thing to be denied knowledge or the right to learn, but I’m sorry to say that examples have been made, and this is an all too real possibility for those who would gladly help you otherwise.

So it seems that other teens are the only option open huh? Well, let me share my experiences with you before you jump in over your head.

As a teenager, I found people in my school who I believed were fun people, and even better, they practiced Wicca! These people actively practiced the religion by which I was so entranced. I felt like I had discovered “my” people. This is a very popular feeling when many people discover Wicca. What I failed to realize at first was that these people were my age. They had the normal teenage problems that I did. They weren’t all mighty and able to banish their problems with a twitch of their noses or the wave of a magick wand. While they may have had a year or two more than me in which to practice what I was just discovering, I eventually realized that I had a year or two in maturity on them.

Everyone’s personality is different, and not all people can co-exist nicely. High school teaches this to everyone. You can’t get along with everyone on this Earth, and not everyone agrees on everything.

Getting back to my group, I was now in a coven. Oh yeah, we had an initiation. It took place in one member’s basement, with a makeshift altar on a knock hockey board, and a wickedly sharp knife pressed to my throat as I croaked out the words “Perfect love and perfect trust.” (I believe that my bulging eyes may have belied that statement a little.)

I had to prick my finger with the rest of them, let one drop of blood fall into the wineglass, and then drink of our communal blood/wine offering. I was amazed at the depth of their knowledge. It felt as though I knew only the tip of the iceberg. Thus was I plunged headlong into idolatry.

I idolized those in my new group of “friends.” They were so much wiser than I was. (Never mind the fact that I was on the honor roll and each of them was failing a few classes.) They were my teachers, though I may not have agreed with what I learned.

“The most important thing, ” I was told, “is to protect yourself.” For, unbeknownst to me, we had enemies. There were other covens in my school who would attack me with evil magick just because I was weaker than they were. I was in a war, and by joining with this coven, I had unknowingly chosen sides.

I watched as my friend and covenmate crafted a spell in which to bind someone else with his blood. I was terrified. Was I going to be the next victim? Who would strike out at me? I had no enemies; at least that’s what I thought. My friends told me otherwise. I later found out that while some other Pagan groups in my school did not exactly like the people I had gotten involved with, they weren’t about to waste their time doing nasty spells on us.

They were smarter than that. I wish my friends could see that. To this day I can still say that I am grateful to my Catholic upbringing for keeping me from dabbling in nasty hate magick and bindings. I abstained from assaulting anyone else, much to the dismay of one particular covenmate. They eventually stopped teaching me, as we all had our own lives to see about.

I began to gain my knowledge solely from the many books which I had acquired. As I read the accounts and teachings of more and more older and wiser Witches such as Raymond Buckland, Scott Cunningham, Silver RavenWolf, and Doreen Valiente, I realized that my so called “teachers’ were not all that wise.

My visions of their power shattered. They were simply ordinary teenage witches, just like me. One of them had a dark streak, true, but most of the others were in it for acceptance, power trips, and maybe for two of us at least, to teach and to learn.

It’s too bad that the one designated as my teacher wanted me to pursue a slightly different path than I wanted to. Mysticism looked nice enough, but I was focusing on Wicca at the time, and I had my other interests too. They eventually began to lose interest in me, partly because I trusted my books over them, and also because I refused to even learn “black magick.” “I’m a white witch, ” I would tell them. I now realize that there is no such thing, but I tried to come as close as possible.

Well, according to them, white was weak. I trusted in Karma and the Law of Three to protect me, and if necessary, an occasional Justice spell. They did not agree. I should fight back. Hell, I should strike first. I didn’t think so.

Now I realize that that blood binding initiation ritual was an absolutely stupid thing to be lead into. A blood binding is extremely hard to break, even with mutual consent among all involved. I am still with these people, and more have joined us, some have left. I am trapped. I lent a covenmate my pentacle, and he took my athame too. He has two of my most treasured and personal items, and I have no way of getting them back. Teenagers can be extremely petty.

I plan to get out of this so called “coven” as soon as I can get my stuff and hightail it out of there. Until that opportunity arises, or it comes time for me to go away to college, I seem to be stuck with this crowd of wayward witches. It’s not like I’ve given up hope for them or anything, for a real witch never gives up hope. It is simply a matter of knowing when it’s best to try a little harder, and when to move on.

So what’s the moral of this story?

High school covens are a bad idea. There is a distinct difference between a coven and a study circle. A study circle would be much better for a high school setting. What most teenagers fail to realize about a coven is that it isn’t just a “come when you want to and we’ll have fun learning together” kinda deal.

A coven implies responsibility. There are lots of problems, like mediating disputes, group dynamics, witch wars, the whole perfect love and perfect trust, and lots of other group related problems. There is usually some type of hierarchy, which is the perfect opportunity for someone to be oppressed, used, dumped, and others to go on power trips, make wrong decisions, and pressure others into things that they don’t want to do.

There’s the problem of who will teach what, and who wants to teach what to whom. Most teenagers are simply not old enough or experienced enough to carry these responsibilities.

So take my advice. If you’re a teenage witch and you feel the need to interact with others of like mind, don’t seek out, form, or join a coven. Find some nice open-minded friends, and create a study circle. One where there are no obligations, no pressures, and no one has power over another. Encourage the free exchange of ideas and learn from and with each other. At this age, a coven is not all it’s cracked up to be.


Imbolc

By Psyche | January 6, 2001 | Leave a comment

2 February NH
31 July SH
First Full Moon in Aquarius

Some etymologists believe the word ‘Imbolc’ comes from the Gaelic Oi-melc, ewe’s milk. A variation of the spelling, ‘Imbolg’ is also common. This festival is especially sacred to Brigid, which is why it is also called ‘Brigantia’. Among Christians, it is known as ‘Candlemas’, a festival of candles.

This festival is dedicated both to the Goddess and the God, celebrating the light returning once again to the land.

The Goddess is seen as being Mother, as she has recently given birth to the Sun God, and is nurturing Her young Son. In some traditions the Goddess is seen as dwelling in the Underworld during the cold, harsh winter times as the Earth is barren. Near Imbolc, however, the Earth is beginning to show signs that the winter is receeding. Therefore the Goddess is also seen as Maiden, young as the growing year.

In many traditions, Yule is the time when the God is reborn anew, the day of the longest night of the year. After this, the daylight hours start getting longer, until the peak at Litha. Around Imbolc it becomes more noticible that the days are indeed lengthening and the Sun rises earlier.

Neo-pagans today celebrate Imbolc in various ways. In some traditions the Goddess is invited to leave the Underworld and live again in the Middle World, or Nature is called back. Sometimes invited by invocation, by one person or many in a coven ceremony, sometimes by lighting candles, or bonfires, or chanting, dancing, leaving offerings, lighting candles, etc.

The Celtic Goddess Brigid (Bride) is often invoked at Imbolc. She is seen as being a ‘Fire Goddess’ and is therefore very appropriate when considering that this is a festival to celebrate the return of the Sun. For those who favour a Roman pantheon Vesta is also suitable.

Popular themes for this time of year include ‘Reawakening’, ‘Purification’ and ‘Initation’. Imbolc is a favourite time for initation among many covens, or if already initiated, Reaffirmations to the Goddess and the God.


Moon Phase Terminology

By Psyche | January 1, 2001 | Leave a comment

New Moon:

The Moon is not illuminated by direct sunlight. Here, the Moon is Maiden.

Waxing Crescent:

The visible Moon is partly but less than one-half illuminated by direct sunlight while the illuminated part is increasing. The Moon is Maiden.

First Quarter:

One-half of the Moon appears illuminated by direct sunlight while the illuminated part is increasing. The Moon here is Maiden/Mother.

Waxing Gibbous:

The Moon is more than one-half but not fully illuminated by direct sunlight while the illuminated part is increasing. Three days before the Full Moon. The Moon here is Mother.

Full Moon:

The visible Moon is fully illuminated by direct sunlight. Here the Moon is Mother.

Waning Gibbous:

The Moon is less than fully but more than one-half illuminated by direct sunlight while the illuminated part is decreasing. Three days after the Full Moon. The Moon here is Mother.

Waning Crescent:

The Moon is partly but less than one-half illuminated by direct sunlight while the illuminated part is decreasing. The Moon here is Mother/Crone.

Last Quarter:

One-half of the Moon appears illuminated by direct sunlight while the illuminated part is decreasing. Here, the Moon is Crone.

As the Moon takes an average of 29.5 days (not 28 days as most people think) to orbit the earth we can have either 12 or 13 full moons in a year.

In the case where we have a 13th full moon in a year (2 full moons in one month) the second full moon in the same month is called a “Blue Moon”.


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