Tag: Satanism

Black Flame Tarot, by Jennifer Chen

By Psyche | June 19, 2006 | Leave a comment

Black Flame Tarot, by Jennifer Chen
Companion book: Guide to the Black Flame Tarot, Komodokat Productions, 78 (+2), 2005

“The Black Fire flames to life when we remember ourselves, and it charges forth when we cast our will into the universe. It burns away lies and illusions, and purifies that which is absolute within us.”

The Black Flame Tarot derives its name from the Satanic movement of the 1960s, the “Black Flame” denoting the “divine gift man gained from a rebellious cosmic figure.” It stands a symbol for “man’s highly evolved sense of self-awareness, and the possibility that consciousness being of a cosmic origin.” Continue reading


Review: Cthuloid Dreams, by DJ Lawrence

By Psyche | July 24, 2004 | Leave a comment

Cthuloid Dreams: A Collection of Occult Poetry, by DJ Lawrence
Chaosmagic.com, 115 pp., 2004

Inspired and influenced by the Discordianism, Lovecraft mythos and Setianism, DJ Lawrence has compiled a collection of poetry gathered over the years.

Often lyrical with delightful turns of phrase, Lawrence seems taken with decidedly darker themes, with titles such as ‘Bitter’, ‘Set’, ‘Death’, ‘Necronomicon’, and of course, the title-poem ‘Cthuloid Dreams’.

This is a neat collection of more than sixty short poems, whose evocative imagery would lend itself well to inclusion in darker themed rites.

Cthuloid Dreams
can be purchased exclusively from Chaosmagic.com’s online store.


Pacts With The Devil, by S. Jason Black & Christopher S. Hyatt

By Psyche | May 28, 2004 | Leave a comment

Pacts With The Devil, by S. Jason Black & Christopher S. Hyatt Pacts With the Devil: A Chronicle of Sex, Blasphemy and Liberation, by S. Jason Black and Christopher S. Hyatt
New Falcon, 1561840580, 285 pp. (incl. appendices and post-scripts), 1993, 1997, 2002

The authors open with a bit of demonic theory and brief overview of Satanic and demonic pacts throughout history. They explain that they “prefer to believe in the existence of non-human forces,” while at the same time acknowledging that there is “no ‘proof’ of their existence in the scientific sense. More, [there is] no proof that these forces are good or evil – or that even our human concepts apply to them.” The histories they’ve collected are varied, and humorously recounted. Unfortunately a bibliography is not included, and the reader is left to seek out the source of most of these stories hirself. However the entire text is peppered with personal anecdotes, both awesome and entertaining, and the reader is easily drawn in. Continue reading


Review: The Chaos Cookbook, edited by DJ Lawrence

By Psyche | May 11, 2004 | Leave a comment

The Chaos Cookbook, edited by DJ Lawrence
Chaosmagic.com, 221 pp. (incl. bibliography), 2004

The Chaos Cookbook is a result of the combined effort of the Dead Chaoists’ Society, edited by its founder, Dead Jellyfish. It’s an interesting assortment of brief essays and ready-made group and solitary rituals for a variety of occasions.

Chaos magick theory is only briefly touched upon in a few short essays at the start of the book, as a brief introduction as to what is to come. Indeed, chaos magick itself is only ever loosely defined; Lawrence states that ‘…Chaos Magick does not use a concrete theoretical focus, the emphasis in Chaos Magick is on the Doing rather than the Explaining…Thus, in Chaos Magick a system of belief is a means to an end and is not an answer to the mystery of Life, the Universe and everything’. Continue reading


Review: Rebels and Devils, edited by Christopher S. Hyatt

By Psyche | August 13, 2003 | Leave a comment

Rebels & Devils: The Psychology of Liberation, edited by Christopher S. Hyatt
New Falcon, 1561841536, 428 pp., 1996, 2000

Rebels and Devils is a collection of works from some of the most rebellious and accomplished minds of our time; including such notorious authors as William Burroughs, Phil Hine, Peter Carroll, Austin Osman Spare, Aleister Crowley, Israel Regardie, Robert Anton Wilson, Timothy Leary, Osho, and naturally Christopher S. Hyatt, as well as various others. Not only a collection of essays, it also consists of various photographs, poetry, biographies, interviews and even a comic drawn by S. Jason Black and co-written by Hyatt. Comprised of more than works psychology and magick; anything that could be deemed rebellious or individualistic; also covered are such topics as yoga, meditation, sex, drugs, guns, death, and the difference between rebellion and revolution.

I’ve never read anything by Israel Regardie before, as his most famous works seem centred around the Golden Dawn, and I’ve never had much use for formal magickal orders, so I was somewhat surprised to discover while reading an interview between him and Hyatt (‘The Final Words of a Western Master’) that he was so funny, as I tend to see that sort of thing as being dry work. Both humourous and insightful, he made an excellent point regarding the misconceptions readers have about the authors they read, very one dimensionally, and this certainly helps expand that.

In ‘The Calling of the Holy Whore’, Diana Rose Hartman, the only female author in the entire compendium, offers an intelligently refreshing re-interpretation of the Judeo-Christian myths surrounding Satan/Lucifer in the rebel guise, noting how ‘devil’ and ‘divine’ grew out of the same Indo-European root word devi, and ‘demon’ came from the Greek for genius, daemon. Hart contributes an interesting feminist perspective to rebellion, in embracing the holy whore within ourselves.

Christopher Hyatt reflects on the methods of modern slavery in ‘Who Owns the Planet Earth':

“While most humans agree that slavery is evil – that the ownership of one human by another is immoral – few humans equate slavery with enforced education, welfare, health, and the idea of a perfect orderly universe. Slavery is usually associated with power over others and with the ability to enforce one’s will on another without the fear of retaliation. Within the “right” of ownership and debt there is a hidden mystery – a metaphysics – a knowledge only available to those with the power to create and enforce their metaphysics. Whenever a new group achieves power, they also inherit the metaphysics and magickally, the ability to use it.”

While Osho notes in ‘Rebellion is the Biggest “YES” Yet':

“Rebellion is an individual action; it has nothing to do with the crowd. Rebellion has nothing to do with politics, power, violence. Rebellion has something to do with changing your consciousness, your silence, your being. It is a spiritual metamorphosis.”

The myriad of discussions on rebellion and liberation in its various forms make this a book to be treasured for years to come. While not every essay is a shining jewel to be discovered, there is a sufficient number that makes Rebels and Devils defiantly worth reading. I recommend that they be read as they appear, even though one may not be interested in every subject discussed, they do follow a loose sequence.


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