Spirituality

Opiate of the masses.

Definition of Paganism

By Psyche | April 6, 2007 | Leave a comment

Depending on your background, the word ‘pagan’ can mean a variety of things. It may mean one who is not Christian, Muslim or Jewish, or one who has o religion. It could simply mean one who isn’t Christian, or conjure fantastic hedonistic images of orgiastic rites. These definitions have had their place n the past, but definitions have a way of changing with time depending on usage and culture.

Our modern word ‘pagan’ comes from the Latin paganus, meaning ‘country-dweller’. Similarly, the word ‘heathen’, which has come to mean one who does not acknowledge the Christian, Muslim, or Jewish god, literally means ‘heath-dweller’. Both these words refer to someone from the country or rural district, as opposed to more urban folk.

The initial spread of Christianity took place in major urban areas, leaving the countryside continuing to practice folk magick and adhere to the local customs. It wasn’t long before the word became synonymous with the idea of rustic folk tradition and those who were not followers of the Christian god, thus giving rise to many of the more modern meanings we understand today.

More recently, however, the definition of Paganism has evolved yet again to become a general term for the followers of magickal, shamanistic, and polytheistic religions which hold a reverence for nature as a central characteristic of their belief system. It’s also given rise to the term neo-pagan (literally ‘new pagan’), which refers to a follower or sympathizer of one of the newly formed pagan religions now spreading throughout the world. It is with this latter modern definition that this section will be predominantly concerned.


First published on Suite101.com on 11 March 2006. (Unfortunately.)


Spring has sprung: are you cleansing?

By Victoria Anisman-Reiner, B.S.c | July 2, 2006 | Leave a comment

Lemons, photo by Trevor LeyenhorstI’ve been asked by at least a dozen people in the past two weeks about cleansing. This article is the result, to explain and introduce the concept of cleansing. I’ve done perhaps a dozen different cleanses myself, most of them involving supplements. Some have been more intensive cleanses in which I changed the foods I eat (like the one I’m doing now).

In every case, I have felt dramatically better after and during the cleanse – I have more energy, I feel happier and more grounded, and my allergy symptoms lessen and go away. Cleansing is a part of every good health regime, for a simple reason: what goes in to our bodies eventually has to come out. We are bombarded every day with stressors and toxins and many of them lodge in our bodies as acid, mucus, or fat. These toxins –from our air, water, food, and our living and work environments – can slow down the body’s metabolism and lower immunity, leaving you feeling sluggish, heavy, tired, and ultimately causing illness and disease.  Continue reading


Why Spirituality?

By Spiral Nature | July 2, 2006 | Leave a comment

“Spiritual life helps us find our meaning and purpose within existence, reminds us of our calling to elevate, or to save, or to liberate ourselves and others from the illusions of how we wish life could be, and celebrate and rejoice in the experience that is right in front of us. A religious/spiritual life shows us that although the Divine may seem distant and inexplicable, It is also available to us in every moment.”

–Susan Quinn, The Deepest Spiritual Life

“In selecting beliefs we might as well try to go for maximum entertainment value and capability enhancement, regardless of the so-called ‘facts’; for if a human really wants something, statistics count for nothing.”

–Peter Carroll, PsyberMagick


Discordian Totems

By Psyche | July 2, 2006 | Leave a comment

Jackalope, image from Tyler NienhouseJackalope

These are a special sub-species of rabbit with the antlers of a deer. Elementally, they combine earth and air, and reside in the north-east corner of the compass rose. They are earthly creatures; practical, but intellectual, as their horns harness the cerebral vibrations of air. They demonstrate their almost unique synthesis of earth and air qualities in their ability to bring theoretical ideas and manifest them in reality, making use of their abstract natures in a material setting. Discordians with a jackalope as their totem tend to be successful in their idealistic pursuits. Continue reading


Beltane

By Psyche | May 1, 2006 | Leave a comment

A celebration of spring, the third and culminating fertility festival, and one of the eight major festivals in the Wheel of the Year.

The third fertility festival, after Imbolg and Ostara, Beltane is one of the four Greater Sabbats in the Wiccan Wheel of the Year. It’s opposite on the Wheel is Samhain, the third harvest. In the northern hemisphere we observe this day on April 30th through May 1st, and in the southern hemisphere, on October 31st through November 1st. As at Samhain, at Beltane the veils between the worlds are said to be thin. Though where Samhain is a celebration of Death, at Beltane we celebrate Life renewed.

There are a variety of spellings for this holiday, depending on which regional variation of Galic is used. It is also known as Beltain, Bealtaine, Bealtainn, among others. Beltane roughly translates to ‘bright fire’, ‘shining fire’, or ‘Bel’s fire’.

Fire plays an important part in Beltane celebrations as it is symbolic of the Sun God’s growing strength and warmth of the season. Fire is a sacred representation of purity and healing, and Wiccans traditionally jump through the fire, or dance around it.

Beltane marks the true end of winter: summer has now begun in earnest. Trees and bushes sprout new leaves, flowers and fruit blossoms bloom, crops are new and the pleasures of the Earth seem bountiful again. Life has again returned to the Earth.

The Young God has grown into manhood, and the Goddess is fertile, to be ripe with his fruit. Handfastings are popular at Beltane, in sympathy of the union of the Goddess and God as queen and consort.

Of course, one of the more well known traditions is the Maypole dance. The Maypole is representative of the phallus and the sacred union between Earth and Sky, the pole standing between the worlds. As the sexual union of the Goddess and God are played out at this time, so do couples fertilize the fields with their sacred unions at this time, ensuring the fecundity of the Earth, and bountiful harvests to come.

The altar is often decorated with local blossoms and flowers from asked plants.

It is a time to celebrate the fruitfulness of the Earth, and productivity in your life.

First published on Suite101.com on 1 May 2006. (Unfortunately.)


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