Tag: golden dawn

How well do you know Pamela Colman Smith?

By Psyche | September 2, 2014 | 2 comments

Detail from Photograph of Pamela Colman Smith

Our August 2014 poll tested your knowledge of Pamela Colman Smith (1878-1951).

Most of you knew that she illustrated the Rider Tarot (89%), more than half of you knew she was a member of the Golden Dawn (51%), and some knew her nickname was Pixie (40%), that she wrote and illustrated other books (40%), but only a handful of you knew she lived in Jamaica (37%). Continue reading


The Essential Enochian Grimoire, by Aaron Leitch

By Gesigewigu's | August 18, 2014 | 1 comment

The Essential Enochian Grimoire, by Aaron LeitchThe Essential Enochian Grimoire, by Aaron LeitchThe Essential Enochian Grimoire: An Introduction to Angel Magick from Dr. John Dee to the Golden Dawn, by Aaron Leitch
Llewellyn Worldwide, 9780738737003, 352 pp. (incl. appendices), 2014.

Considering everything that has been written on Dr John Dee and Edward Kelley’s Enochian system in the last century and a half, one can’t help but wonder what could be considered “essential” for an Enochian grimoire. Where does one start? What is included? Which Enochian systems? Which elements? Leitch admits this was a challenge when sorting out the material and decided “[i]t must present a simplified overview of the entire system, thereby allowing the student to see the whole proverbial elephant before focusing on the trunk, ears, legs, or other elephantine components in detail.” Again though, with all that Dee wrote, and all that has come since, a simplified overview is not an easy task. Continue reading


Rewild witchcraft, worship Loki, and get rich

By Spiral Nature | June 28, 2014 | 1 comment

Linkage, chain background image by Faramarz Hashemi
Magick

Check out this video of the Carl Jung and John Constantine ritual performed by Ian Cat Vincent & co in Liverpool last year, in honour of the stage adaptation of Robert Anton Wilson‘s Cosmic Trigger.

Lupa’s most recent book is Plant and Fungus Totems, and in this article for Llewellyn, she explains why she looks beyond the animal kingdom and what lessons these totems can teach us.

Want to get rich? Here are three ways, and, oh, do these things too. Continue reading


Grimoires, by Owen Davies

By Mike Gleason | July 24, 2013 | Leave a comment

Grimoires, by Owen DaviesGrimoires, by Owen DaviesGrimoires: A History of Magic Books, by Owen Davies
Oxford University Press, 978-0-19-959004-9, 380 pp., 2009

I need to acknowledge right now that I am not a ceremonial magician, but then again, this book is written for people like me. This is not a compilation of grimoires, nor is it a distillation of those books. It is a broad overview of magick books and books about magick (which are not necessarily the same thing). There is a fairly thorough discussion of the suppression of magick books, which makes it abundantly clear that, although most of us think in terms of the Christian church’s efforts in this respect, Christianity was a “Johnny come lately” to that game. There had been suppressions long before the beginning of the Common Era.

This type of book often falls into one of two categories. It is either heavily influenced by pop culture, or it is full of erudite, academic attitudes which leave you grabbing your dictionary as you read. This book walks the middle ground quite nicely. It answers questions with easily understood words, and saves the inevitable citations for the end of the book.

One thing which modern readers often forget when reading about the grimoires of the past is that simply because two (or more) books had the same name did not mean they had they same content, especially in a time when the books in circulation were manuscripts, as opposed to printed volumes. Religious scholars has this brought home to them with the discovery of the Nag Hammadi library where there were numerous books with identical names and widely varying contents. Grimoires were, generally, perceived as having more power if they were handwritten (magicians would make handwritten copies of books which they had in their library to impart more power to them). What this means is that even those grimoires which have survived in printed form may only be one version of numerous ones which circulated during the Renaissance and later periods. Continue reading


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