Tag: sexuality

Letters: Queer inclusivity

By Spiral Nature | November 21, 2014 | Leave a comment

Spiral Nature Letters, Mailbox background by RaSeLaSeD - Il Penguino, with additional work by Psyche

 

Recently we posted a call for writers where we outlined what we’re looking for in terms of content and writers for the site, and it included this line from our submission guidelines:

We are especially excited to receive pitches from writers who are queer, trans, people of colour, and/or awesome.

This call was crossposted on Facebook, Twitter, and also to the wonderfully socially conscious Tumblr, where we received the following anonymous ask:

I like what you’re doing but I really hate the word “queer.” Not everyone is comfortable with reclaiming that slur, so maybe you could move away from it as an umbrella term and just say “LGBT+” or something like that? Idc if individuals call themselves that but I dislike being referenced that way.

This kind of feedback is really important, and I replied on Tumblr, but I thought I would address it here on the website as well, for any other anons who may have felt uncomfortable with the term. Continue reading


Rewild witchcraft, worship Loki, and get rich

By Spiral Nature | June 28, 2014 | 1 comment

Linkage, chain background image by Faramarz Hashemi
Magick

Check out this video of the Carl Jung and John Constantine ritual performed by Ian Cat Vincent & co in Liverpool last year, in honour of the stage adaptation of Robert Anton Wilson‘s Cosmic Trigger.

Lupa’s most recent book is Plant and Fungus Totems, and in this article for Llewellyn, she explains why she looks beyond the animal kingdom and what lessons these totems can teach us.

Want to get rich? Here are three ways, and, oh, do these things too. Continue reading


Divine Duality, by William Keepin

By Ryan Valentine | April 25, 2011 | 1 comment

Divine Duality, by William Keepin, Ph.D. with Cythia Brix, M. Div. and Molly Dwyer, Ph.D.Divine Duality: The Power of Reconciliation Between Women and Men, by William Keepin, Ph.D. with Cynthia Brix, M. Div. and Molly Dwyer, Ph.D.
Hohm Press, 9781890772741, 298 pp., 2007

Divine Duality is perhaps one of the most interesting attempts at a meaningful reconciliation of contemporary gender issues I have read in a long time. It asserts no certain formula or particular answer and so I cannot find any particular or certain fault with it. Abandoning the trite simplifications of popular self help models (Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus) which ultimately not only fail to address the deeply conditioned and limiting idea’s about gender (held internationally, regardless of social model, religious bias or cultural prerogative,) but most often shamelessly reinforce them.

Instead, Dr. Keepin attempts to provide guidelines for a compassionate deconstruction. Men and women are brought together and made to confront the realities and limitations of each other’s lives and perspectives. Continue reading


Sexual Outlaw, Erotic Mystic, by Vere Chappell

By Psyche | December 9, 2010 | 1 comment

Sexual Outlaw, Erotic Mystic: The Essential Ida Craddock, by Vere Chappell, with an introduction by Mary K. Greer
Weiser Books, 978157863476, 258 pp. (incl. appendix and references), 2010

Described as an anthology embedded in a biography, Sexual Outlaw, Erotic Mystic contains most of Ida Craddock’s published writings edited, annotated and placed in context by Vere Chappell.

Ida Craddock was a nineteenth century American sexologist, feminist and mystic who was persecuted by Anthony Comstock’s Society for the Suppression of Vice. Her contribution to conventional sex reform, and her mystical writings on sex with spiritual beings are exceptional for the period. Continue reading


William Blake’s Sexual Path to Spiritual Vision, by Martha Keith Schuchard

By Mike Gleason | May 11, 2010 | Leave a comment

William Blake’s Sexual Path to Spiritual Vision, by Martha Keith Schuchard
Inner Traditions, 9781594772115, 415 pp., 2008

This is the first paperback issue in this country of a book originally published in 2006 in the U.K. It had its origin in scholarly research but has been diminished in size and complexity, although not in quality, to produce a book more likely to appeal to a non-academic audience.

There is a large amount of background data provided on the subject of 18th and 19th century esoterica. This is important to provide a solid base for the understanding of Blake and his works.

As I have commented in previous Continue reading


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