Tag: mary k greer

Creativity and revolution at TarotCon Denver 2015

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Richard Hartnett demonstrates numerology with the Magician at TarotCon Denver 2015

Richard Hartnett demonstrates numerology with the Magician at TarotCon Denver 2015

As a first-time attendee of a TarotCon, or any tarot-themed convention, I didn’t know quite what to expect. Writers’ conventions and those focused on popular culture, which I’d attended in the past, provided formality and an assortment of presentations housed in large venues.

TarotCon Denver 2015 was on a smaller scale, but had a far deeper impact.

Tarot acts as both personal tool and a means to better read one’s environment. This also holds true when playing with tea leaf readings or spell casting, both of which were also in evidence at this year’s TarotCon.  Continue reading


Sexism in contemporary occulture

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Matches, photo by Dennis SkleySexism is a topic that came up in a forum I recently started participating in. None contested that it was endemic in occulture, but few seemed interested in exploring why this was.

I know women who have been asked “who are you here with?” when they attended events. Several have had men try to “explain” technical points to them, unprompted. In my own experience, at a public gathering, after choosing a stone to represent an element, I overheard a man complain that I should not have been “allowed” to choose Fire. Continue reading


Sexual Outlaw, Erotic Mystic, by Vere Chappell

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Sexual Outlaw, Erotic Mystic, by Vere ChappellSexual Outlaw, Erotic Mystic, by Vere ChappellSexual Outlaw, Erotic Mystic: The Essential Ida Craddock, by Vere Chappell, with an introduction by Mary K. Greer
Weiser Books, 978157863476, 258 pp. (incl. appendix and references), 2010

Described as an anthology embedded in a biography, Sexual Outlaw, Erotic Mystic contains most of Ida Craddock‘s published writings edited, annotated and placed in context by Vere Chappell.

Ida Craddock was a 19th century American sexologist, feminist, and mystic who was persecuted by Anthony Comstock’s Society for the Suppression of Vice. Her contribution to conventional sex reform, and her mystical writings on sex with spiritual beings are exceptional for the period. Continue reading