Tag: kate hoolu

If It Was Easy, Everyone Would Be Doing It!, by Francis Breakspear

By Psyche | August 24, 2009 | 1 comment

If It Was Easy, Everyone Would Be Doing It!, by Francis Breakspear, with contributions from Kate Hoodu and Dave Evans
Hidden Publishing, 9780955523731, 327 pp. (incl. bibliography and index), 2008

Francis Breakspear has written another light-hearted guide to magickal practice, with periodic intrusions by the academically inclined Dave Evans, and the sociologically minded Kate Hoolu. Breakspear casts himself in the role of both taskmaster and as acts a source of comic relief.

I say this book is light-hearted, but it is also meant to be worked through, not merely read. Breakspear constantly calls upon the reader to examine hirself – attitudes, food habits, recreation, sex – and, further, challenges the reader to challenge hirself. Many of the exercises focus on expanding one’s self-awareness, and becoming more fluid in one’s sense of identity. Continue reading


Kaostar!, by Francis Breakspear

By Psyche | November 15, 2007 | 2 comments

Kaostar, by Francis Breakspear Kaostar! Modern Chaos Cunning Craft, by Frances Breakspear
Hidden Publishing, 97809555523717, 118 pp., 2007

The early and mid-nineties saw a number of fresh and innovative books on chaos magick by the likes of Phil Hine, Jaq Hawkins, Jan Fries and, of course, Peter Carroll, but this seems to have petered out by the nills. More recently the rise in print-on-demand publishing companies like Lulu.com and CafePress.com have facilitated a revival in the classic texts, making titles such The Book of Results and The Theatre of Magick by Ray Sherwin available once more.

Chaos magick has never been an especially popular area of occultism; it places itself on the fringe of the fringe, occulted even amongst the occultists – it’s a glamour that suits it well, but there have never been chaos magick books published in the numbers seen by those relating to Golden Dawn style magick, for example. The chaos current has been proclaimed dead numerous times, but there’s life in ‘er yet. Continue reading