Tag: christopher hyatt

Enochian Vision Magick, by Lon Milo DuQuette

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Enochian Vision Magick: An Introduction and Practical Guide to the Magick of Dr. John Dee and Edward Kelley, by Lon Milo DuQuette
Weiser Books, 9781578633821, 261 pp. (incl. appendices, notes, bibliography and index), 2008

Lon Milo DuQUette is the author of more than a dozen books on esoteric subjects, and has served as the OTO’s United States Deputy Grand Master since 1994 This is his second book on Enochian magick, his first being Enochian World of Aleister Crowley: Enochian Sex Magick, co-written with the late Christopher Hyatt.

Enochian Vision Magick opens with an introduction by Clay Holden founder of the John Dee Publication Project, an online archive whose “major purpose of this site is to distribute primary-source materials relevant to the “Enochian” work of John Dee and Edward Kelly”,. Two prologues follow by DuQuette outlining his interest in and involvement with Enochian magick for the past thirty years. Continue reading


Psyche’s list of chaos magick books

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Books, photo by az
This list of chaos magick books was first published in an information pamphlet created for the Hamilton Pagan Harvest Festival in September 2007.

Read these for a taste of the philosophy surrounding chaos magick:

Chaos magick is first and foremost about achieving results, therefore, don’t merely read these, do them: Continue reading


Review: What You Should Know About the Golden Dawn, by Francis Israel Regardie

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What You Should Know About the Golden Dawn, by Francis Israel Regardie, forward by Christopher S. Hyatt
New Falcon Publications, 1561840645, 233 pp. (incl. appendix), 1936, 2006

Seventy years later, Francis Israel Regardie’s works remain today a principal source of information regarding the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn. He believed that the Golden Dawn was “the sole depository of magical knowledge” and “the only Occult Order of any real worth”. While this may seem slightly exaggerated, it certainly was at the forefront of the scene at the time.

While he may have believed in the order’s practical and mystical methods, he no longer believed the Golden Dawn was the ideal medium to transmit this knowledge. As others (primarily Crowley) had already disclosed some of it, he thought it prudent to reveal all its teachings to the public to ensure its preservation.

However much he believed in the order, he also offered some harsh criticisms against its Chiefs, leaders, and members primarily in regards to grade-lust. Regardie touched on the order’s various complications and its complex history, believing that “[t]he root of the trouble, quite apart from the grade misconceptions as well as the curse of vanity, was of course that the work was only cursorily performed. No one really cared a fig for Magic and spiritual development. No one really strived for mastery of any technique. Grades, and grades alone, were the goal”. This may remain familiar to many currently practicing in various orders or groups. Unfortunately, no obvious solutions are forthcoming, at least not for ‘saving’ or ‘curing’ the order itself.

Regardie presents a more or less balanced view of his experience with the order, pointing out its faults, while continuing to revere its teachings. He received flack for the publication of this, and other Golden Dawn material, however he believed he was acting in accordance with the Work itself. Indeed, he rather boldly states: “If I am guilty of treachery and have mistakenly worked against the intent and purpose of the true occult forces behind the Golden Dawn…then willingly I open myself to the avenging punitive current…if my present act be contrary to the true intent of whatever divine powers may be, willingly let my “Rose be blasted and my power in Magic cease”. Evidently the powers that be did not take offence.

He gives an overview of the order’s grades and basic theory, as well as an outline of its syllabus. Further commentaries from other authors are tacked on to the end, as well as additional documents supporting Regardie’s claims.

It seems almost gossipy at times, however reservedly presented. The use of magickal mottos or their initials in lieu of mundane names may be a term of respect or to preserve member’s privacy, but it may seem difficult for those not already acquainted with the subjects to keep track of who’s who, and the fluctuation between mundane and motto may further flummox the reader.

This presents an interesting perspective and personal history of the Golden Dawn, and should prove a fascinating read for anyone considering joining or learning more about their teachings.


Ceremonial Magic & The Power of Evocation, by Joseph C. Lisiewski

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Ceremonial Magic & The Power of Evocation: A System of Personal Power, by Joseph C. Lisiewski
New Falcon Press, 204 pp.

This books is a paradox in that it is both an excellent reference book and tome and at the same time illustrates what happens when a magician becomes inflexible. Lisiewski makes some excellent points about the new age movement of magic and the problems that can occur if you only visualization. Also his point about being as faithful as possible to the grimoires you work with is well worth noting in terms of the build-up of magic and belief that can make an evocation successful, or not as the case may be. Continue reading


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