Tag Archives: sufism

Review: T.A.Z., by Hakim Bey

By Psyche | October 1, 2002 | Leave a comment

T.A.Z.: The Temporary Autonomous Zone, by Hakim Bey
Autonomedia, 0936756764, anti-copyright 1985, 1991

Have a couple of dictionaries standing by, or be sure to have a few dozen bookmarked online while reading this, for if you’re to appreciate Bey’s prose, you’re likely to need ‘em. He writes in a strange way, obviously highly intelligent, but rambling, and if you’re not quite sure what he’s on about, it’s just going to seem worse.

There are a lot of ideas in here, based on things I’m not very familiar with, such as Sufism and dadism – some of which are at least partially explained, but this is one of those books you need to read, and then come back to later and see how it compares. Certainly on the first go struggling somewhat to get a feel for how his mind works on paper.

It’s a very inspiring work, which he may loathe to hear, but I intend to do something about it. I recommend reading it to anyone interested in expanding their interests and testing the limits of one’s mind. Agreeing with everything he presents isn’t necessary, but thinking about it is – doing even better. Highly recommended reading.