Tag Archives: sigils

Magick squares, sigils and planetary seals

By Triplemoon and Michael Pendragon | May 16, 2001 | Leave a comment

Magic Square, photo by Marco FedeleThese pages detail an ancient form of magick that have been updated for modern practitioners. It incorporates the use of magick squares and sigils for a more focused intent in spell work. Magick squares are used to draw in the influences of their corresponding planet. Bear in mind that with any work of magick the inclusion of universal forces should be in harmony with your intent. Continue reading


Fireclown’s sigilization basics for the confused

By Fireclown | February 26, 2001 | Leave a comment

Sigil, photo from Aaron MuszalskiOk, so you haven’t read Liber Null, Practical Sigil MagicThe Grey Book, Visual Magick, or anything else on sigil magick, and don’t have any money and/or hate books anyway. May this brief bit of fluff aid you in some way.

History

Sigilization, or sigil magick, is generally attributed to Austin Osman Spare. I feel he got the idea from drawing up monograms as a child, or perhaps from looking at watermarks on paper.

End of History Section.

Theory

The general idea is that magick functions on a subconscious or deep mind level, and that the logical or discursive mind only hinders the manifestation of results. It does this by 1) “Lust of Result,” and 2) constantly denying the possibility of manifestation — i.e., “I can’t get laid ‘cos I’m a bastard!,” or “I’m stupid and clumsy and have no social graces, therefore I can’t be a waiter, even though I really really want to be one.” There are other reasons, but I’m not going to go into them here. Continue reading


Sigils, servitors and godforms: part II

By Marik | November 16, 2000 | 1 comment

Spirits, image by TorleyServitors, psychodynamics and models of magick

Chaos magick, at least if approached by through the Internet and conversation with chaos magicians, can appear a sprawling, contradictory mess of techniques to the newcomer. The relativistic stance of chaos magick, and it’s apparent lack of a unifying template can appear both morally disturbing and intellectually frustrating, especially to occultists coming to it from more traditional paths. Continue reading


Sigils, servitors and godforms: part I

By Marik | November 11, 2000 | 6 comments

Astaroth sigill, photo by eleraamaSigils, servitors and god-forms are three magical techniques that chaos magicians use to actualize magical intentions. Sigils are magical spells developed and activated to achieve a specific, fairly well defined and often limited end. Servitors are entities created by a magician and charged with certain functions. Godforms are complex belief structures, often held by a number of people, with which a magician interacts in order to actualize fairly broad magical intentions. These three techniques are not quite as distinct as these definitions would suggest, they tend to blur into one another. The purpose of this essay is to explain these magical tools, indicate their appropriateness for different types of magical intentions, and show how these tools relate to the general theories of chaos magick and of Dzog Chen, a form of Tibetan Buddhism.

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The fluid continuum –or– what the f***’s an egregore?

By Fenwick Rysen | September 1, 1999 | Leave a comment

From: Fenwick Rysen
Newsgroups: alt.magick.chaos
Subject: Re: one other question — egregores
Date: 1 Sep 1999 16:10:35 GMT
Organization: Chaos Matrix (www.chaosmatrix.com)

lo eskis i

WOW! Two good questions in the same day! Is a.m.c. coming back from the dead? No, it’s probably just the statistical good day we’re allowed after a year of crap.

Quoth Jim Mooney (cybercoyote@mindspring.com):

<< Of the three books I just got on Chaos Magic, they all mention egregores, but there is not much of a definition of the term, except by context. Could someone here give me a good definition >>

Well, the best place to look is any decent dictionary. I’d give you the definition out of the copy of Webster’s Ninth New Collegiate that I keep on my desk, but it’s not a good dictionary—it doesn’t even have it in there. Essentially, “egregore” is an older English word that seems to be fading out of use. It refers to the “spirit of a thing,” usually referring to some organization humans create (clubs, states, fraternities, counties, etc.) that summates its principles, beliefs, and goals, and guides people in accomplishing them. Continue reading


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