Tag: servitors

Spirit Pistol

By Dakarren Windwolf | January 17, 2001 | Leave a comment

This technomagick device is used to combat various ephemeral entities which might plague the user, such as rogue servitors, enemy servitors, or various demons. It fires a burst of invigorated negative energy, which, like fireballs, disrupts a spirit’s energy conglomerate. Of course this weapon is still experimental, and might not work against the higher orders. The intensity of the blast probably works on other factors as well, such as the level of damaging energy the crystal has been charged with, and the voltage of the taser, as well as the intent and accuracy of the wielder.

As before mentioned, the weapon is experimental, and it’s effectiveness has not been examined against different types of energy based entities. Meaning, it has not been used against lots of spirits. The device might also function against humans, but there is no information about this currently. Any further data one might come upon will be wonderful for developing a new model sometime in the near future. If new field data is obtained, please mail to .

Due to the havoc energies contained in the crystal, storage of the device should be in silk, as it is unknown if the crystal seeps the negative energies it’s been charged with.

Construction of a Spirit Pistol

Ingredients:

  • 1 2.5 quartz crystal point, other crystals might be used, but quartz is versatile
  • 1 stun gun, commonly referred to as a ‘taser’

Charge crystal with negative, destructive, ‘havoc’ energies. This can be done by dumping all anger and rage as energy into it, taking blood from injuring someone and rubbing it on the crystal, dipping it in unholy water, casting destructive spells into it, and whatever you can think of. This can be continued for as long as you wish.

Epoxy the crystal point between the contacts of the taser, so the plasma arc can touch it.

Theory:

This weapon works on the theory that the havoc energies contained in the crystal can be empowered with the high voltage energy from the taser, and fired at a spirit target via the wielder’s mental accuracy. In theory, the crystal shouldn’t need more negative energy infusions after attachment to the taser, as the energy should be proper fuel, and the negativity would just be a focus for that energy, a tainted magnifying glass, if you will. However, long term use has not been tested, so that is more data I’d like to receive by anyone willing to create and field test this equipment.

Note:

This crystal focus/taser theory would most likely work as a healing agent, if the crystal were charged with nurturing, healing energy. This device is a project for later, which I might partake on in any time from now to three years.


Sigils, servitors and godforms: part II

By Marik | November 16, 2000 | 1 comment

Spirits, image by TorleyServitors, psychodynamics and models of magick

Chaos magick, at least if approached by through the Internet and conversation with chaos magicians, can appear a sprawling, contradictory mess of techniques to the newcomer. The relativistic stance of chaos magick, and it’s apparent lack of a unifying template can appear both morally disturbing and intellectually frustrating, especially to occultists coming to it from more traditional paths. Continue reading


Sigils, servitors and godforms: part I

By Marik | November 11, 2000 | 6 comments

Astaroth sigill, photo by eleraamaSigils, servitors and god-forms are three magical techniques that chaos magicians use to actualize magical intentions. Sigils are magical spells developed and activated to achieve a specific, fairly well defined and often limited end. Servitors are entities created by a magician and charged with certain functions. Godforms are complex belief structures, often held by a number of people, with which a magician interacts in order to actualize fairly broad magical intentions. These three techniques are not quite as distinct as these definitions would suggest, they tend to blur into one another. The purpose of this essay is to explain these magical tools, indicate their appropriateness for different types of magical intentions, and show how these tools relate to the general theories of chaos magick and of Dzog Chen, a form of Tibetan Buddhism.

Continue reading


The fluid continuum –or– what the f***’s an egregore?

By Fenwick Rysen | September 1, 1999 | Leave a comment

From: Fenwick Rysen
Newsgroups: alt.magick.chaos
Subject: Re: one other question — egregores
Date: 1 Sep 1999 16:10:35 GMT
Organization: Chaos Matrix (www.chaosmatrix.com)

lo eskis i

WOW! Two good questions in the same day! Is a.m.c. coming back from the dead? No, it’s probably just the statistical good day we’re allowed after a year of crap.

Quoth Jim Mooney (cybercoyote@mindspring.com):

<< Of the three books I just got on Chaos Magic, they all mention egregores, but there is not much of a definition of the term, except by context. Could someone here give me a good definition >>

Well, the best place to look is any decent dictionary. I’d give you the definition out of the copy of Webster’s Ninth New Collegiate that I keep on my desk, but it’s not a good dictionary—it doesn’t even have it in there. Essentially, “egregore” is an older English word that seems to be fading out of use. It refers to the “spirit of a thing,” usually referring to some organization humans create (clubs, states, fraternities, counties, etc.) that summates its principles, beliefs, and goals, and guides people in accomplishing them. Continue reading


Fotamecus empowerment rite

By Fenwick Rysen | October 25, 1997 | Leave a comment

Pocket watch, by Lauren HammondIntroduction:

Fotamecus is a historically recent addition to the pantheon of deities associated with time, the other major one of note being Chronos. But whereas Chronos is associated with the concept of time as fixed and immutable, Fotamecus depends on the concept that time is fluid and malleable. It is because of Chronos’ restrictions of freedom through the concepts of fixed time that Fotamecus has decided to wage war on him; the following ritual is aimed at aiding Fotamecus in the war against Chronos, and in gaining his favour through helping him. Because modern societies are completely dependent upon clock and currency (time is money), aiding Fotamecus in destroying current conceptions of time can be considered one further step in the immanentization of the eschaton. Continue reading


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