Tag Archives: Satanism

Punk zen monks, Baphomet and Slenderman

By Spiral Nature | July 26, 2014 | 2 comments

Linkage, chain background image by Faramarz Hashemi
Magick

Chaos magick is all grown up, and if there are punk zen monks, there are also chaote monastics.

Are you a bad witch? Bad Witches is a new blog and it’s off to a strong start, with posts on hacking the tarot, and what Jove’s up to on Thor’s day and how you can make harness that money magick goodness. (Or is that badness?)

Mindfulness meditation centred around Baphomet? Count me in.

Check out Sable Aradia’s great two part (so far) series on sex magick, “A Sticky Subject: Teaching Sex Magick: Part I” and “Part II“. Important reading. Continue reading


Of course Thelema is satanic

By Thomas Zwollo | June 4, 2014 | 6 comments

Demon, photo by Orin Zebest

Let’s get something straight. Thelema is most certainly satanic, but it is not in any way, whatsoever, Satanism. Now, I am sure many reading this statement will ask, what’s the difference? The answer lies in the role Satan plays. Continue reading


Occult Profiling: Where it comes from and why it’s worth fighting

By Beth Winegarner | February 15, 2013 | Leave a comment

For the past couple of years, I’ve had a Google Alert set for the word “Satanic.”

I created it because I wanted to study how media use the word. Every day, news stories and links containing the word “Satanic” wend their way to my inbox. They range from articles about Salman Rushdie (all of which mention The Satanic Verses) to pieces about Toyota recalls, calling sticky gas pedals “Satanic.”

However, many are articles about crime. Big, gory, violent crime, and petty graffiti depicting pentagrams and other symbols. Continue reading


Is it Hailing or Not (Are We Satanists?)

By Francis Breakspear and Kate Hoolu | July 5, 2012 | Leave a comment

This slight annoyance of being regularly asked by ‘fluffy Pagans’ if we are Satanists probably goes with the territory of being chaos magicians – at the very least we are supposed to eat a baby a week, it seems. The founder of Satanism, the late Anton LaVey, made the very pragmatic point that “stories of unbaptized babies being stolen by Satanists… were not only effective propaganda measures, but also provided a constant source of revenue for the Church, in the form of baptism fees. No Christian mother would, upon hearing of these diabolical kidnappings, refrain from getting her child properly baptized, post haste.” It’s all about the money, honey.

We have also had dealings with several people who would fall under the stereotypical definition of ‘real nutjobs about Satan.’ These include one especially memorable person at an academic conference on alternative religion that we attended a while back. Continue reading


The Light of Sex, by Maria de Naglowska

By Psyche | August 1, 2011 | 4 comments

The Light of Sex, by Maria de NaglowskaThe Light of Sex: Initiation, Magic, and Sacrament, by Maria de Naglowska
Translated by Donald Traxler, Forward by Hans Thomas Hakl
Inner Traditions, 9781594774157, 125 pp. (incl. appendices, notes and index), 2011

Maria de Naglowska (1883-1936) was born as Mariya Naglovskaya in St Petersburg. She left Russia for Berlin before settling in Geneva; lived in Rome, and later Paris. The rumours surrounding her fly: she may have known Rasputin, she may have had a love affair with Julius Evola, she may have been a member of this or that secret society. We do know that she was a journalist, a poet, and she has several books to her name.

Today de Naglowska may be best remembered for her “translation” of Paschal Beverly Randolph’s Magia Sexualis, which, as I learned from the Donald Traxler’s introduction, seems to have included much of her own material, as well as that from other sources. Though with this new translation of The Light of Sex – the first time it has appeared in English – and several other translations of her work forthcoming from Inner Traditions, her renown is likely to grow.

In Paris de Naglowska earned the nickname La Sophiale de Montparnasse” for her teachings on “Satanism” and sex magick. Though she called herself a “Satanic woman”, her views on Satanism were not based on traditional Christian mythology. She equated god with life, and Satan with the negation of life, and both aspects are a necessary part of being human. Continue reading


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