Tag: satan

Ritual tools, Riz Aleister Crowley, and occultnik art shows

By Spiral Nature | August 22, 2014 | Leave a comment

Linkage, chain background image by Faramarz Hashemi

Magick

It’s not necessarily the tradition that makes the magician.

Feel like your magick runs in cycles? Here are some suggestions for how best manage your time.

Do you have to make your own ritual tools? (Bonus: Read our review of Aaron Leitch’s latest book, The Essential Enochian Grimoire.)

The ins and outs of word magick.

Spirituality

On community and mentoring Pagan youth. Continue reading


The Light of Sex, by Maria de Naglowska

By Psyche | August 1, 2011 | 4 comments

The Light of Sex, by Maria de NaglowskaThe Light of Sex, by Maria de NaglowskaThe Light of Sex: Initiation, Magic, and Sacrament, by Maria de Naglowska
Translated by Donald Traxler, Forward by Hans Thomas Hakl
Inner Traditions, 9781594774157, 125 pp. (incl. appendices, notes and index), 2011

Maria de Naglowska (1883-1936) was born as Mariya Naglovskaya in St Petersburg. She left Russia for Berlin before settling in Geneva; lived in Rome, and later Paris. The rumours surrounding her fly: she may have known Rasputin, she may have had a love affair with Julius Evola, she may have been a member of this or that secret society. We do know that she was a journalist, a poet, and she has several books to her name.

Today de Naglowska may be best remembered for her “translation” of Paschal Beverly Randolph’s Magia Sexualis, which, as I learned from the Donald Traxler’s introduction, seems to have included much of her own material, as well as that from other sources. Though with this new translation of The Light of Sex — the first time it has appeared in English – and several other translations of her work forthcoming from Inner Traditions, her renown is likely to grow.

In Paris de Naglowska earned the nickname “La Sophiale de Montparnasse” for her teachings on “Satanism” and sex magick. Though she called herself a “Satanic woman,” her views on Satanism were not based on traditional Christian mythology. She equated god with life, and Satan with the negation of life, and both aspects are a necessary part of being human. Continue reading


A Note on LaVeyan Satanism

By Psyche | December 15, 2008 | Leave a comment

Far too long has the subject of Satanic magic and philosophy been written down by wild-eyed journalists of the right-hand path.

–Anton Szandor LaVey, The Satanic Bible.

While not a “wild-eyed journalist of the right-hand path” (whether defined in Tantric, Blavatskian or newage terms), I have, over the past few months, shared some rather amusing sensationalist news stories written by those who are. I thought it only fair to take the time to write a short piece on “real” Satanism and go beyond highlighting some of the more absurd stories that rise up out of the deep.

This is a little tricky as Satanism is a broad term these days encompassing a variety of religions. There’s “traditional” Satanism which does involve devil-worship and Luciferianism which (sometimes) runs along similar veins. However, there’s also “modern” and LaVeyan Satanism which does not, as these Satanists are atheistic, holding the self in the highest position of reverence.

For years I managed the website for the Satanic Continue reading


Satanic Mythos: A brief study of four infernal archetypes

By Noktvs Infernvs | January 1, 2003 | Leave a comment

Red Sky, photo by DinosaursAreNotDeadWebster defines myth as “a story or belief that attempts to explain a basic truth.” There have always been story-tellers amongst us. From the time humanity first learned to speak we have tried to express our thoughts concerning the world around us, as well as the world of our own imaginations. Mythology, religion, philosophy and science have all grown out of these thoughts. At first there was only the oral traditions, passed from generation to generation by word of mouth. With the advent of writing (circa 3500 B.C.E.) the transmission of ideas increased and the integrity of the information was more easily preserved for future generations. Comparative mythology scholars, like Adolph Bastian and Joseph Campbell, recognize two main aspects that can be applied to all forms of mythology. These are the “local” and the “universal” aspects. As Campbell writes in his Primitive Mythology: Continue reading


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