Tag: psychology

Divine Duality, by William Keepin

By Ryan Valentine | April 25, 2011 | 1 comment

Divine Duality, by William Keepin, Ph.D. with Cythia Brix, M. Div. and Molly Dwyer, Ph.D.Divine Duality: The Power of Reconciliation Between Women and Men, by William Keepin, Ph.D. with Cynthia Brix, M. Div. and Molly Dwyer, Ph.D.
Hohm Press, 9781890772741, 298 pp., 2007

Divine Duality is perhaps one of the most interesting attempts at a meaningful reconciliation of contemporary gender issues I have read in a long time. It asserts no certain formula or particular answer and so I cannot find any particular or certain fault with it. Abandoning the trite simplifications of popular self help models (Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus) which ultimately not only fail to address the deeply conditioned and limiting idea’s about gender (held internationally, regardless of social model, religious bias or cultural prerogative,) but most often shamelessly reinforce them.

Instead, Dr. Keepin attempts to provide guidelines for a compassionate deconstruction. Men and women are brought together and made to confront the realities and limitations of each other’s lives and perspectives. Continue reading


Feminine Mysteries of the Bible, by Ruth Rusca

By Mike Gleason | September 24, 2010 | Leave a comment

Feminine Mysteries in the Bible: The Soul Teachings of the Daughters of the Goddess, by Ruth Rusca
Bear & Company, 9781591430889, 144 pp., 2008

Rusca approaches the feminism in the Bible from a somewhat unique perspective. Born in Switzerland in 1929 to German Protestant parents who lived in an Italian-speaking Catholic village, she received a religious education which encompassed both cultures. Add to that mixture an appreciation of the work of Carl Jung and you have the makings of a unique approach.

She has found a four-fold path of women as both mothers and daughters. She sees them as embodying the aspects of sacred sexuality without, necessarily, approaching the concept of the Mother Goddess as it is currently conceived by modern neo-Pagans. Continue reading


The Self in Transformation, by Hester McFarland Solomon

By Psyche | July 9, 2009 | Leave a comment

The Self in Transformation, by Hester McFarland Solomon
Karnac Books, 9781855755703, 332 pp., 2007

Solomon is a Jungian analyst who brings a depth of understanding to and sympathy to Freudian themes that I’ve not encountered previously. The papers collected here were written over a twenty year period, largely published in journals, save for the final essay, which was written especially for this volume.

Part I introduces the theme of the work, which is Continue reading


Beyond Happiness, by Gay Watson

By Gesigewigu's | June 12, 2009 | Leave a comment

Beyond Happiness: Deepening the Dialogue Between Buddhism, Psychotherapy and the Mind Sciences, by Gay Watson
Karnac Books, 9781855754041, 193 pp. (incl. appendices), 2008

Psychology, psychotherapy and the mind sciences have shown a growing interest in their links with the Buddhist models of the mind and the Buddhist psychology, this book is another effort to put forth some of what has been coming out of this interaction.

While it may seem odd, I was glad in the intro when Watson admitted her limitations for this writing she is “not a scientist and freely admit that my understanding of these fields come from secondary sources which report back to the interest layperson from the fields of research.” Several books I’ve read on this topic have the authors presenting themselves as more of an authority than perhaps they have the right to.

Beyond Happiness also goes beyond similar books, for it not only discusses Buddhism in light of psychology but includes neuroscience and neurobiology as part of the exploration. The book follows the pattern of View, Meditation, and Action, a familiar pattern of thought to many Buddhists. Continue reading


Carl Jung: Darwin of the Mind, by Thomas T. Lawson

By Gesigewigu's | May 21, 2009 | Leave a comment

Carl Jung: Darwin of the Mind, by Thomas T. Lawson
Karnac Books, 9781855754683, 226 pp., 2008

Jung is often considered what of the greatest minds of the age, one of the founding fathers of psychology. Lawson seeks “to pull together the thought of Carl Jung and place it in a non-technical way within a contemporary context, so as to make it accessible to the general reader” as Jung never wrote much for the public. Rather than being a “Jung 101″ book, or a dumbed down version of his writings, this book is an intelligent exploration of Jung’s ideas relying less on the professional language of psychology, focusing on the consciousness and unconsciousness as a direct product of evolution.

“we have a mechanism whereby conscious might evolve. The mechanism is directly analogous to genetic evolution and operates according to the basic formula of natural selection”

Lawson compares Darwin’s model of evolution to Continue reading


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