Tag: phil hine

Abraxas, Issue One, Autumn Equionx 2009

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Abraxas, Issue One, Autumn Equionx 2009Abraxas, Issue One, Autumn Equinox 2009, edited by Robert Ansell and Christina Oakley Harrington
Fulgur, 128 pp., 2009

Abraxas isn’t just “An International Journal of Esoteric Studies”, this first issue is also an art book. At 290mm x 232mm it’s a large quarto, beautifully bound, and printed on high quality paper, including a handtipped sheet. Richly coloured paintings are beautifully reproduced, along with many lovely illustrations in monochrome. And then there’s the text.

This first issue focuses largely on witchcraft, and while I can’t detail every essay that appears, I would like to highlight several that I felt stood out in this already exceptional collection.

Stephen Grasso’s piece “Skip Witches, Hop Toads”, illuminates Continue reading


The Four Powers, by Nicholas Graham

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The Four Powers The Four Powers, by Nicholas Graham
Megalithica, an imprint of Immanion Press, 1905713045, 128 pp. (incl. appendices, glossary, annotated bibliography), 2006

The Four Powers was written as the book Graham wished he’d had to accompany him on his first forays into magick as a young adult. As such, following a forward by Lupa (an early magickal co-conspirator and author of Fang and Fur, Blood and Bone, also published with Immanion Press), a note to parents is included. It seems unlikely a parent would buy this book for their teen, flip through it and find this message addressed to hir, though it’s a nice gesture. Continue reading


Review: The Pseudonomicon, by Phil Hine

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The Pseudonomicon, by Phil Hine
New Falcon Publications, 1561841951, 64 pp. (incl. bibliography), 1996, 2004

This slim tome offers a living example of an approach to Lovecraftian magick and working with and within the Cthulhu Mythos.

Though it has its basis in fiction, the Cthulhu Mythos remains appealing not despite unfilled gaps, but because of them, as Hine notes. There remains some sense of otherness, mystery and even danger to the Mythos which is alluring and indeed devilishly attractive to those put off by the softer side of worship and magick

A true chaote, Hine states that he “cannot really see the point of magical approach which does not, at some point, risk derangement” (pg 48). Invoking Cthulhu surely invites madness, and therein lies great power, a concept many shamans would be familiar with. Yet insanity remains the last taboo. Continue reading


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