Tag Archives: peter carroll

Review: Liber Bootleg, by Peter Carroll

By Prenna Unsane | March 14, 2005 | Leave a comment

The Chaos Magick Audio CDs, Volume 2: Liber Bootleg, performances by Peter J. Carroll, Ian Read, Ingrid Fischer & Charly Brewster
CD, New Falcon Publications, 1561842524

This is an interesting CD set. It is a re-release of some out of print cassettes that were previously available. The first disc is introduced as being a collection of basic magick workings. Most of the rituals on this disc are protective rituals that can be used as alternative banishing rituals. The introduction suggests that some of them can be used for basic personal fortification, protection from nightmares, or from poltergeist activity. It also warns against attempting these rituals while heavily under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

The first two rituals come from the Golden Dawn. The first being a version of the qabalistic cross, the second being a “Dispersion by Pentagram”. These are followed by “Mass of Chaos C” and a reading apparently from “Theogony of Hesiod”.

An “Asgard Pathworking” is next, which for me is one of the highlights of CD1 of this set. The pathworking takes you on a journey to Asgard where you must pass Heimdall before reaching Valhalla and having an audience with Odin. This is the easiest of the rituals to follow but some knowledge of runes would be of use to the listener.

Next is “Pillar of Chaos” which aims to improve visualisation and can be used to relax and recharge the individual at any point of the day it may be required. It is quite a simple techniques to follow and I certainly found it relaxing.

“The Mummy and The Mirror” is an interesting guided enegry movement, which uses Egyptian mythology and iconography to help one create a protective shell around oneself. I can myself using this ritual a lot as it is easy to follow and works with a paradigm I don’t normally use.

“Green + Black” is an odd ritual that could do with a lot more explanation before I could say much about it.

The cd finishes with a basic gnostic banishing ritual.

All in all I think this is a very interesting CD that could be very useful for the Chaote to get inspiration for new workings if they feel their practice is getting a little stale. The introduction to this cd gives the impression of being an introduction to magickal practice. I thing it does have the potential for this but most of the rituals are not fully explained, which would leave the novice wondering what is going on. If this had been accompanied by a short booklet explaining each track then I would highly recommend it to novices.

CD2 in this two CD set is much better in my opinion. The introduction gives much more insight into what is to follow. It states that the rituals presented are only presented as a historical record of the practices of the individuals at the time of recording. It also suggests that invocation and evocation are exercises not suitable for the beginner who should begin with the other disc.

The first ritual on the disc is “Mass of Chaos B”, which is the mass of Chaos published in “Psychonaut” by Peter Carroll. I always find it fascinating to hear others performing rituals that I myself have engaged in and this is no exception.

The next track is “The Enochian Call of the 10th Aethyr”, which is quite drawn out and is one of the least interesting tracks on this disc, though it may appeal to those iwth an interest in Enochian/John Dee.

“Disursus Cum Daemone” is an invocation of Choronzon to ask advice. Invocation is an area I haven’t yet experimented with so this made for interesting listening. This ritual and the one that follow it are the highlights of CD2, in my opinion.

The next ritual is “Evocation of Tiamat”. For me this is the best of the historical records on this disc. Tiamat is invoked to give advice for the Chaotes present. Tiamat comes across as quite funny and is obviously enjoying the experiment and amused by the humans. This track on the CD alone is worth the money for me.

“Target Practice” is another ritual that is not given much of an explanation but is an interesting listen all the same.

The CD ends with a “Chao/Runic banishing”, which is quite basic and could be useful for those looking for ideas for a personal banishing ritual.

This CD of the two probably offers the most to both beginners and old-hands at the magick game. With the fuller explanation at the beginning of the CD novices will have more of an idea of what is going on and be able to see what kind of things are possible if they stick to their magickal practices. More experienced magickians will get the benefit of hearing other people performing rituals that they may include in their own practice. They may even pick up some different approaches. A couple of the tracks are just entertaining hearing the interactions between the magickians and the invoked beings. I’m glad these cassettes have been re-released in cd form and are more readily available.

If I were to give this a mark out of 10 it would have to get a 7. This would be improved by the inclusion of a booklet explaining some of the nuances of the rituals presented.


Review: The Chaos Cookbook, edited by DJ Lawrence

By Psyche | May 11, 2004 | Leave a comment

The Chaos Cookbook, edited by DJ Lawrence
Chaosmagic.com, 221 pp. (incl. bibliography), 2004

The Chaos Cookbook is a result of the combined effort of the Dead Chaoists’ Society, edited by its founder, Dead Jellyfish. It’s an interesting assortment of brief essays and ready-made group and solitary rituals for a variety of occasions.

Chaos magick theory is only briefly touched upon in a few short essays at the start of the book, as a brief introduction as to what is to come. Indeed, chaos magick itself is only ever loosely defined; Lawrence states that ‘…Chaos Magick does not use a concrete theoretical focus, the emphasis in Chaos Magick is on the Doing rather than the Explaining…Thus, in Chaos Magick a system of belief is a means to an end and is not an answer to the mystery of Life, the Universe and everything’. Continue reading


Review: PsyberMagick, by Peter Carroll

By Psyche | January 21, 2004 | Leave a comment

PsyberMagick: Advanced Ideas in Chaos Magic, by Peter J. Carroll, illustrated by S. Jason Black
New Falcon Publications, 1561840920, 130 pp. (incl. further reading), 1995, 1998, 2000

‘In selecting beliefs we might as well try to go for maximum entertainment value and capability enhancement, regardless of the so-called ‘facts’; for if a human really wants something, statistics count for nothing.’

And this represents the central theme of Psybermagick, which is essentially a collection of magickal maxims intended to compliment his two previous works Liber Null & Psychonaut and Liber Kaos. As a supplementary text, it further develops the ideas previous presented, and indeed the rituals and commentaries assume that the readers possess both previous works.

Psybermagick is predominantly compiled of brief notes on various subjects with a page or so of commentary, all in e-prime. Carroll covers subjects such as retroactive magick, magickal attack, politics; as well as introducing a few more magickal equations. Yes, Carroll is still playing around with physics, trying to find a mathematical justification for magick, which I find very unnecessary, distracting and, frankly, impractical.

In this work Carroll has adopted the multiple selves paradigm (or multiple selfs as he terms it). even offering an apology ‘in advance for any irritation and confusion caused by the use of standard Chaotic grammar which avoids all concepts of ‘being’, and uses ‘we’ instead of ‘I’, in recognition of the legionary nature of the personal multimind’.

Carroll does devise an interesting political system called ‘Chaocracy’, operating on the principle of selecting a legislative body ‘purely by random means’, stating that ‘a chaocracy will free us from the conflict of party political ideology with conscience, and free us from the distasteful business of casting our votes amongst professional liars’. It could work, as he says ‘we trust people’s lives to randomly selected juries as the only fair method; should we use any less fair method for a nation or a planet?’

Much of the inspiration for this work is obviously drawn from Crowley as it is written in the style of Crowley’s Book of Lies, and Carroll’s newfound adoption of his spelling of ‘magick’. Though it is still typically infused with Carroll’s personal dogmas, he does demonstrate a unique sense of humour.

Ultimately witty and inspirational, this book will likely find a favoured place on any chaote’s bookshelf.


Review: Rebels and Devils, edited by Christopher S. Hyatt

By Psyche | August 13, 2003 | Leave a comment

Rebels & Devils: The Psychology of Liberation, edited by Christopher S. Hyatt
New Falcon, 1561841536, 428 pp., 1996, 2000

Rebels and Devils is a collection of works from some of the most rebellious and accomplished minds of our time; including such notorious authors as William Burroughs, Phil Hine, Peter Carroll, Austin Osman Spare, Aleister Crowley, Israel Regardie, Robert Anton Wilson, Timothy Leary, Osho, and naturally Christopher S. Hyatt, as well as various others. Not only a collection of essays, it also consists of various photographs, poetry, biographies, interviews and even a comic drawn by S. Jason Black and co-written by Hyatt. Comprised of more than works psychology and magick; anything that could be deemed rebellious or individualistic; also covered are such topics as yoga, meditation, sex, drugs, guns, death, and the difference between rebellion and revolution.

I’ve never read anything by Israel Regardie before, as his most famous works seem centred around the Golden Dawn, and I’ve never had much use for formal magickal orders, so I was somewhat surprised to discover while reading an interview between him and Hyatt (‘The Final Words of a Western Master’) that he was so funny, as I tend to see that sort of thing as being dry work. Both humourous and insightful, he made an excellent point regarding the misconceptions readers have about the authors they read, very one dimensionally, and this certainly helps expand that.

In ‘The Calling of the Holy Whore’, Diana Rose Hartman, the only female author in the entire compendium, offers an intelligently refreshing re-interpretation of the Judeo-Christian myths surrounding Satan/Lucifer in the rebel guise, noting how ‘devil’ and ‘divine’ grew out of the same Indo-European root word devi, and ‘demon’ came from the Greek for genius, daemon. Hart contributes an interesting feminist perspective to rebellion, in embracing the holy whore within ourselves.

Christopher Hyatt reflects on the methods of modern slavery in ‘Who Owns the Planet Earth’:

“While most humans agree that slavery is evil – that the ownership of one human by another is immoral – few humans equate slavery with enforced education, welfare, health, and the idea of a perfect orderly universe. Slavery is usually associated with power over others and with the ability to enforce one’s will on another without the fear of retaliation. Within the “right” of ownership and debt there is a hidden mystery – a metaphysics – a knowledge only available to those with the power to create and enforce their metaphysics. Whenever a new group achieves power, they also inherit the metaphysics and magickally, the ability to use it.”

While Osho notes in ‘Rebellion is the Biggest “YES” Yet’:

“Rebellion is an individual action; it has nothing to do with the crowd. Rebellion has nothing to do with politics, power, violence. Rebellion has something to do with changing your consciousness, your silence, your being. It is a spiritual metamorphosis.”

The myriad of discussions on rebellion and liberation in its various forms make this a book to be treasured for years to come. While not every essay is a shining jewel to be discovered, there is a sufficient number that makes Rebels and Devils defiantly worth reading. I recommend that they be read as they appear, even though one may not be interested in every subject discussed, they do follow a loose sequence.


Ice Magic: an initial view

By Frater U.: D.: | November 2, 2002 | Leave a comment

Ice, photo by PhotophildeIn the colder regions of the earth, especially so in the area of the Polar circle around the North Pole, the elementary survival of man and animal alike, in their struggle against the most inhospitable powers of nature conceivable, certainly met with a challenge greater than anywhere else. It is no coincidence that it is amongst the tribes and peoples from the most northern regions of our planet that one finds the cradle of technologies and knowledge, the mechanisms and efficiency of which surpass all others. Their description is but one of many tasks which the book Ice Magic meets in an befitting and serious manner. Continue reading


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