Tag Archives: o-books

Traditional Witchcraft for the Seashore, by Melusine Draco

By Mike Gleason | July 10, 2014 | Leave a comment

Traditional Witchcraft for the Seashore, by Melusine DracoTraditional Witchcraft for the Seashore, by Melusine DracoTraditional Witchcraft for the Seashore, by Melusine Draco
O Books, 9781846944260, 159 pp., 2012

The majority of books I encounter on the subject of witchcraft and Wicca fall into one of two categories: they are written for rural witches, or for urban witches, as though those are the only two options. If you believe the stories of how things were in the “bad old days,” witches were seldom found in either of those two settings. They were most often found in the transitional (or “liminal”) areas – the last house in the village just before you entered the countryside, or the first house after such a point. They weren’t living in the wilds, but they weren’t comfortable in the daily to-do of the village centre either.

This book addresses another transitional space: the seashore. Continue reading


Loneliness and Revelation, by Brendan Myers

By Psyche | June 22, 2011 | Leave a comment

Loneliness and Revelation, by Brendan MyersLoneliness and Revelation: A Study of the Sacred, by Brendan Myers
O-Books, 9781846943553, 165 pp. (incl. bibliography), 2010

Loneliness and Revelation is comprised of forty-five thought provoking meditations on loneliness; Myers takes a close look at what it is and what it means for the individual as an existential condition.

More than just solitude or isolation, loneliness gives rise to the thought that one’s life may be “utterly insignificant and meaningless“. We combat this through what Myers calls Revelation, ways of being in the world and asserting our presence here, both for ourselves and those around us.

He explores this theme through various friends, philosophers, world religions both major and minor, referencing myth and literature. In doing so, he surveys the various ways we stave off loneliness, while noting that loneliness is something we return to again and again. Continue reading