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Review: A Witch Like Me, edited by Sirona Knight

By Mike Gleason | October 1, 2004 | Leave a comment

A Witch Like Me: The Spiritual Journeys of Today’s Pagan Practitioners, by Sirona Knight
New Page Books, 2002

Right off the top let me say that I hope this book inspires another one or two in the same line, although perhaps not limited to book authors. I love the idea of learning more about some of the background of some of the “big names” in Paganism. Of course, some of the people I would most like to read about are deceased, but perhaps there are close associates who could provide the data for “posthumous interviews.” In another vein, perhaps a book of fictional biographies could be assembled for the likes of Harry Potter, Sabrina, Samantha (“Bewitched”) Stevens, the “Charmed” sisters, etc.

It is difficult to critique a book like this, other than on technical grounds, since it is composed of individual life stories and opinions. I truly believe that everyone is entitled to their own opinions, no matter if they match up with mine or not. So, I find myself in the position of not being able to disagree with any of the statements contained within this book.

Perhaps the only legitimate criticism I can level at this book, if it is that, is that of the fourteen authors presented here (Dorothy Morrison, Phyllis Currot, Raymond Buckland, Z. Budapest, Marion Weinstein, Patricia Telesco, Raven Grimassi, Lady Sabrina, Skye Alexander, A.J. Drew, Silver Ravenwolf, Timothy Roderick, and Sirona Knight), there are only a few who are “Old Timers” (i.e., their first published work came out 20 or more years ago). Even that, however, merely reflects the author’s choice to deal with those individuals who have stood up for their beliefs, and who are still on the cutting edge of the evolving religion of Wicca.

This is a fun book. No, you won’t learn any deep, dark secrets. There are no skeletons in the closet being revealed. And of course, each author presents themselves in the best possible light,. That is human nature and no one can be faulted for that.

It is a book worth reading, because it shows that Wiccans are very human, and that some of us are willing to stand up and take our lumps for our beliefs. Wiccan authors are becoming more visible, and their books more viable. If you want to know more about the works of these authors, they are listed in the appendix. That appendix could form the basis for a decent “wish list” to improve your library.