Tag: mabon

A Kitchen Witch’s World of Magical Food, by Rachel Patterson

By | Leave a comment

Fruit & vegetable box, photo by Ali KarimianA Kitchen Witch's World of Magical FoodA Kitchen Witch’s World of Magical Food, by Rachel Patterson Moon Books, ISBN: 978-1-78279-854-5, 312 pp., 2014After reading Rachel Patterson’s newest book in her Kitchen Witch series, you just might be inspired to give your kitchen a magical makeover. Not only is she a veteran author of five books on magical food, she is High Priestess of the Kitchen Witch Coven and an elder at the online Kitchen Witch School of Natural Witchcraft. With touches of cheeky humour, she describes readying the kitchen and cooking equipment for magical work, seasonal and holiday recipes, magical food for intent, correspondences of various sorts, food for the moon cycle, and food spells. Think “Engagement Chicken” (Glamour magazine’s famous recipe for inducing a man to propose) taken to a whole new level!And yes, the book does include magical recipes using meat. In the opening pages, Patterson explains how to choose and eat meat that has been raised humanely. “For those of us who choose to eat meat I wholeheartedly believe that we should honour the animal that gave its life,” she writes, adding every part of the animal should be used, including bones, skin and feathers. I applaud Patterson for making this point; it is a nuance often lost on those who believe eating meat is unethical and inhumane. Taken a little further, I can imagine powerful magical workings using meat around healing our inhumane factory farming system. Read More

Albuquerque: Magical Mountain Mabon

By | 5 comments

The Magical Mountain Mabon festival, photo by T HunterThis is my fourth time attending the Magical Mountain Mabon festival, and I am excited to return. This is the festival that defines the Land of Enchantment for me.For 15 years the Magical Mountain Mabon festival has made its home here in the mountains east of Albuquerque. T. Hunter (my partner), our dog, and I all awaited our weekend in the woods away from the city and amongst the witches. In our packed van, I miss the turn (not for the first time either) and have to double back. I recall the familiar aspects -- friends, the pancake breakfast, the Wild Hunt in all its twilit glory, and the new, sold out campground, and, of course, Selena Fox, leading a discussion, and the improvisational music around the fire -- just before pulling up at the gate and hopping out to hail the camp.Magical Mountain Mabon is located in Cibola National Forest, Cedro Campground, and holds 250 attendants, half of which are new participants this year. The new online registration seems to have reached more people than in years past, and this creates a packed and excited atmosphere. Read More

Mabon: The harvest of the autumn equinox

By | Leave a comment

Wheat harvest, photo by Bernat CaseroTwice a year, in the spring and in the autumn, day and night are equal, and we call these times equinoxes. The second harvest (between Lughnasadh and Samhain) corresponds to the autumnal equinox and is called Mabon, a modern name derived from the Welsh god Modron, son of the Earth Mother goddess. In the northern hemisphere, daylight will lessen and night will grow longer, as the Earth prepares to sleep. Traditionally, it’s a time of continuing to give thanks for abundant crops before food becomes scarce. Read More

Mabon, by Diana Rajchel

By | Leave a comment

Harvest apples, photo by Liga EgliteMabon, by Diana RajchelMabon: Ritual, Recipes & Lore for the Autumn Equinox, by Diana Rajchel Llewellyn Worldwide, 978-0-7387-4180-2, 227 pp. (incl. appendix, further reading, bibliography, and index), 2015Reading Mabon: Ritual, Recipes & Lore for the Autumn Equinox brought my attention to Lewellyn's Sabbat Essentials series highlighting the eight sabbats celebrated in many Pagan traditions. The Wheel of the Year is common throughout many Pagan communities and creating literature for each season sets a great intent to understand them more deeply. As a career author and journalist with publications in Llewellyn's annuals, The Beltane Papers, Circle Magazine, Facing North, and SageWoman, Diana Rajchel (also the former executive editor of the Pagan Newswire Collective) has the chops for this title.Mabon has six chapters bookended by two sections. Following the series introduction, Rajchel dives into the topics of old and new ways, spells and divination, recipes and crafts, prayers and invocations, and rituals of celebration. The appendix of the book includes tables of correspondences for Mabon, a list of further reading, a bibliography and index. The book as a whole provides many ways to enjoy the autumnal equinox, regardless of the path one walks. Ritual leaders, festival-planners, school-groups, and families can all use this book to deepen their understanding of the myths and practices of Mabon, while also providing some great conversation starters for discussion groups. Solitaries will enjoy the many simple and home-based crafts, spells, and divinations. Read More

Autumn Equinox, by Ellen Dugan

By | Leave a comment

Autumn Equinox: The Enchantment of Mabon, by Ellen Dugan Llewellyn Worldwide, 0738706248, 208 pp., 2005This wonderful book is easy to read and appreciate. Ms. Dugan has arranged things in an easy to use format and has included spells, charms, and rituals throughout. Most importantly, to my way of thinking, a large amount of this book is not Pagan-specific. It is family-friendly, so it is applicable whether used for your coven-mates or your more conventionally oriented “mundane” family members.She gives ideas for decorations (many of them easy enough to make that children can help), as well as the background on the deities associated with the season. She gives suggestions for gardening, as well as uses for fruits and grains in the celebrations. Read More