Tag Archives: lee lozowick

Zen: Simply Sitting, by Philippe Coupey

By Psyche | August 3, 2011 | 1 comment

Zen: Simply Sitting, by Philippe CoupeyZen: Simply Sitting: A Zen monk’s commentary on the Fukanzazengi (Universal Guide on the Correct Practice of Zazen) by Master Dogen, by Philippe Coupey
Forward by Lee Lozowick, Translator’s preface by Marc Shaver
Hohm, Press, 1890772615, 114 pp. (incl. notes, glossary and index), 2006

Zen: Simply Sitting is a book in two parts. The first is the text of the Fukanzazengi , written by Master Dogen (1200-1253) in 1227, and later revised into its final form in 1242-1243. It is the final version, the Rufubon, which is reproduced here. As we learn, fukan means “recommended for the people”, meaning that the text is intended for laypeople, not only monks and priest.

The Fukanzazengi is extremely brief, only a few pages long, and it deals with the practice of zazen, seated meditation. Master Dogen describes the correct posture and attitude one should maintain while sitting. His prose is sparse and direct, with clear guidelines on how it should be done. Continue reading


Feast or Famine, by Lee Lozowick

By L. D. Taylor | April 13, 2011 | Leave a comment

Feast or Famine, by Lee LozowickFeast or Famine: Teachings On Mind and Emotions, by Lee Lozowick, with an introduction and afterword by Regina Sara Ryan
HOHM Press, 978-1-890772-79-6, 219 pp. (incl. afterword, appendix and index), 2008

Feast or Famine is a collection of partial talks and Q&A sessions given by Lee Lozowick to groups of his students. Lee is a spiritual teacher of 35 years, and the ‘spiritual son’ of Yogi Ramsuratkumar. Lozowick himself had minimal involvement with the book, which was the project of one of his students, Regina Sara Ryan. In addition to editing duties, Ryan wrote the Introduction and the Afterword, which includes a selection of Lozowick’s devotional poetry. She also includes a passage from one of Lozowick’s diaries (which he publishes for the use of his students) as an appendix.

The book comprises 13 chapters on the behaviour of mind and emotions, which follow a similar pattern: Lee uses teachings from other spiritual traditions as a starting point for discussion. Lozowick is an eclectic teacher, drawing from Tibetan Buddhism (Chogyam Trungpa, Pema Chodron), Gurdjieff, Sufi Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee, Zen master Seung Soen, Swami Prajnanpad, Arnaud Desjardins, E.J. Gold, Dr. Robert Svoboda, and Carlos Castenada, among dozens of others. Continue reading