Tag: fotamecus

Interview with Taylor Ellwood

By Psyche | June 5, 2006 | Leave a comment

Goku, image by Rob Walker

Taylor Ellwood is the author several occult titles to date, and his latest work, Inner Alchemy, will be out later this fall.

This interview took place Saturday, May 20th, 2006 online.

Psyche: How do you define your spirituality these days?

Taylor Ellwood: My spirituality is defined in my drive to experiment and test the edge of magic and what it can do. My spirituality shifts as needed as I continue to experiment with a variety of paradigms and of course with the development of my own systems of magic. A large part of my spirituality is focused on internal alchemy and energy work, specifically working with the internal environment of the human body and consciousness.

P: How is this expressed in terms of your daily life?

TE: In my daily life I do a series of ritual workings everyday, primarily a combination of Far Eastern meditation, breathing techniques and some energy techniques I’ve developed on my own. However, my spirituality also expresses itself in my daily life through my boundless curiosity and interest in learning any and everything and applying it to my spirituality.

P: If you had to pin a label on it, what would you call it?

TE: *laughs* Oh that’s asking the impossible. Seriously if I were to give it and myself a label I’d just say experimental magician and my spirituality a label of experiment in progress.

P: Fair enough. How has pop culture influenced your work?

TE: Pop culture has influenced my work greatly, specifically because it is the contemporary culture I live in and I find it to be very rich and full of media and symbols and possibilities to play with. Pop culture was my initial foray into experimental magic and as such it still inspires a lot of my other forays into experimentation. I’d also say that pop culture, for me, is the embodiment of not just the contemporary world, but also an embodiment of where consciousness could take us, for better or for worse. Continue reading


Interview with Fenwick Kaidevis Rysen

By Psyche | April 24, 2006 | Leave a comment

Gears, by martinak15

An interview with Fenwick Kaidevis Rysen, chatting about altered states of consciousness, enlightenment, and his theories on integral magick.

Fenwick Kaidevis Rysen is the creator and maintainer of the website the Chaos Matrix (now a historical archive of version 6.0), and is working on his first book, tentatively titled Integral Magick.

The interview took place the evening of April 18th, 2006.

Psyche: Could you describe your path?

Fenwick Kaidevis Rysen: I started out, up until age 17, as a very strict scientific rationalist who left open the possibility of parapsychological and psychic phenomenon. After I woke up out of that, I spent a long time studying magick, first elementalism and then chaos magick; from there, Discordianism.

P: What sparked the change?

FRK: Ah, that was a specific event. I was in Sacramento on August 9th, 1994, and shortly after noon I walked into a small new-agey gift shop in Old Town called … Damnit, I’m blanking on the name. Anyhow, in the shop I found a book about runes that appealed to my interest in Viking history, and a pewter pendant that called to me for some unknown reason. Continue reading


Fotamecus empowerment rite

By Fenwick Rysen | October 25, 1997 | Leave a comment

Pocket watch, by Lauren HammondIntroduction:

Fotamecus is a historically recent addition to the pantheon of deities associated with time, the other major one of note being Chronos. But whereas Chronos is associated with the concept of time as fixed and immutable, Fotamecus depends on the concept that time is fluid and malleable. It is because of Chronos’ restrictions of freedom through the concepts of fixed time that Fotamecus has decided to wage war on him; the following ritual is aimed at aiding Fotamecus in the war against Chronos, and in gaining his favour through helping him. Because modern societies are completely dependent upon clock and currency (time is money), aiding Fotamecus in destroying current conceptions of time can be considered one further step in the immanentization of the eschaton. Continue reading