Tag: diotima

Dancing God, by Diotima

By Mike Gleason | February 21, 2010 | 1 comment

Dancing God: Poetry Of Myths And Magicks, by Diotima
Neos Alexandrian, 9781438210643, 197 pp., 2008

This is the second book issued by Bibliotheca Alexandrina in an attempt to promote the revival of traditional polytheistic religions through publication of a series of books dedicated to the ancient gods of Greece and Egypt (although the contents are not restricted to those two cultures). I reviewed the previous book Written in Wine earlier. Both of these books are primarily composed of poetry (Written in Wine has a few stories as well), although this book is primarily the work of a single author.

The title of this book refers to Pan, although numerous other deities make an appearance on these pages. Most of the poems are very short, but there are occasional longer works as well.

There are occasional Continue reading


Review: And Banish With Laughter, by Soror Diotima

By Mike Gleason | January 29, 2007 | Leave a comment

And Banish with Laughter, by Soror DiotimaAnd Banish With Laughter, by Soror Diotima
Konton Publishing, 4903462056, 267 pp., 2006

Please understand from the very beginning that Diotima is, among many other things, a chaos magician and that (simple) fact colours her perceptions and her presentations. If you are one of those individuals who have a craving for the logical and “scientific” approach to things, you may find this book difficult to appreciate.

Diotima strives, how successfully is for the reader to determine, to make one think. She isn’t interested, as far as I can tell, in readers thinking like her; she just wants them thinking. And, since most folks don’t do that too often, it may be a novel experience for many.

In spite of the image the title may conjure up, this is not Continue reading


Review: Refuge, by Diotima

By Mike Gleason | January 26, 2007 | 1 comment

Refuge, by Soror Diotima Refuge: Tales of Myth and Magick, by Soror Diotima
Konton Publishing, 490346203X, 223 pp., 2005

When was the last time you licked up a book of myths? How about a book which retells myths in a new and novel (although not necessarily modern) way? Well, you’ve got one in your hands right now. And that’s not all. The stories are interspersed with poetry. Both are seemingly simple creations, but they are in actuality much more.

They work on multiple levels – they entertain; they convey older knowledge; and they stimulate your thought processes. These tales of myth and magick are a pleasure to read.

Oh, there are occasional Continue reading