Tag: christopher penczak

Everyday Witchcraft, by Deborah Blake

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Everyday Witchcraft, by Deborah BlakeEveryday Witchcraft, by Deborah BlakeEveryday Witchcraft: Making Time for Spirit in a Too-Busy World, by Deborah Blake Llewellyn Worldwide, 9780738742182, 240 pp.,  2015Deborah Blake is a witch of many hats; she's an artist who runs an art co-op, High Priestess of Blue Moon Coven since 2004, and author of six works of fiction and nine books on witchcraft. She knows her way around a busy life and in Everyday Witchcraft: Making Time for Spirit in a Too-Busy World Blake has compiled many short and sweet acts to encourage the everyday witch into taking a few minutes beyond the ordinary to tap into the world of the elements, deities, ancestors, and spirits.In this book, "witch" refers to a self-identified person, though one need not be a witch to learn from Blake's book. Though she uses the terms Pagan, witch and Wiccan interchangeably, it is clear that her approach is Wiccan. Her magical correspondences, prayer formats, and use of one goddess and one god, reflect Blake's training in Wicca. Regardless, she shows the reader of any path how to build small and meaningful cycles in their own lives in the small moments and spaces that can make a life magical. Read More

The Three Rays of Witchcraft, by Christopher Penczak

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The Three Rays of Witchcraft, by Christopher Penczak Copper Cauldron, 9780982774304, 205 pp., 2010This is the first offering from a new publishing venture, Copper Cauldron. The idea of publishing an offering from Christopher is a good one. With over a dozen books and a half a dozen CD sets under his belt, Christopher is not only prolific, but knows how to convey his information without talking down to his readership.Christopher presents a triple-themed approach to his subject, which is less about Witchcraft and more about the relationships between the three main branches of evolutionary development as he sees it – the divine, the human, and the devas or demigods. Whether you agree with his approach or not, you will find yourself challenged by his writing. It is, in many ways, the antithesis of much modern "occult" writing, which tends towards obscurity and density. Christopher writes clearly and makes no attempt to appear superior to his readers. The information is conveyed clearly and succinctly. Read More