Tag Archives: christopher hyatt

Pacts With The Devil, by S. Jason Black & Christopher S. Hyatt

By Psyche | May 28, 2004 | Leave a comment

Pacts With The Devil, by S. Jason Black & Christopher S. Hyatt Pacts With the Devil: A Chronicle of Sex, Blasphemy and Liberation, by S. Jason Black and Christopher S. Hyatt
New Falcon, 1561840580, 285 pp. (incl. appendices and post-scripts), 1993, 1997, 2002

The authors open with a bit of demonic theory and brief overview of Satanic and demonic pacts throughout history. They explain that they “prefer to believe in the existence of non-human forces,” while at the same time acknowledging that there is “no ‘proof’ of their existence in the scientific sense. More, [there is] no proof that these forces are good or evil – or that even our human concepts apply to them.” The histories they’ve collected are varied, and humorously recounted. Unfortunately a bibliography is not included, and the reader is left to seek out the source of most of these stories hirself. However the entire text is peppered with personal anecdotes, both awesome and entertaining, and the reader is easily drawn in. Continue reading


Review: Enochian World of Aleister Crowley, by Lon Milo DuQuette and Christopher S. Hyatt

By Psyche | March 18, 2004 | Leave a comment

Enochian World of Aleister Crowley: Enochian Sex Magick, by Lon Milo DuQuette and Christopher S. Hyatt, illustrated by David P. Wilson
New Falcon Publications, 1561840297, 162 pp., 1991, 1993, 1997, 2002

Hyatt has ‘found the Enochian system to be the safest, cleanest and most logical system of practical magick one can perform. But it is an art and as such requires not only study and practice but also inspiration and the love-hate relationship all artists have with their craft’. He further advises the reader to ‘resign yourself at the outset to take responsibility for your own magical reality. When you have firmly assumed this responsibility you will realize there is no Enochian universe per se. There is only your universe which you can access by the Enochian formulae. There is no Enochian magick per se. There is only your magick, facilitated by the methods of the Enochian system’.

It contains Liber LXXXIV vel Chanokh, with detailed notes and further explanations preceding the text itself, providing a lucid and detailed guide to the Enochian system via Crowley, spiced with anecdotes describing the authors’ personal experience with the Enochian system.

To further facilitate the ease of understanding the system the authors advise using coloured diagrams, noting that while ‘all this may take a few hours to execute but it will save you months (or as in my case, years) of confusion’ as through colour-coding it becomes more obvious how the tablets relate.

However, the section devoted to sex magick is small, only two short and somewhat vague chapters tagged on the end. Hyatt intends this ‘for the reader who is already knowledgeable on these subjects’, noting that he is merely offering ‘a few helpful hints concerning how Enochian can be used in these areas’. While this may be true, it also means that it doesn’t quite warrant the slightly misleading ‘Sex Magick’ subtitle given to it.

Toward the rear of the book there is an Enochian dictionary; complete with several pages of Enochian words, their pronunciation and English translation. Also included is the Lesser Ritual of the Hexagram, and in the appendix there are several diagrams of the tablets, the pentagrams and signs, as well as eight ‘sex magick symbols’.

Lucid, concise, precise in its language, the Enochian World of Aleister Crowley is excellent as a general introduction to the study Enochian magick through Crowley, if not a practical guide to sex magick.


Review: The Psychopath’s Bible, by Christopher S. Hyatt

By Psyche | February 18, 2004 | Leave a comment

The Psychopath’s Bible: For the Extreme Individual, by Christopher S. Hyatt and Dr. Jack Willis
New Falcon, 1561841749, 216 pp. (incl. appendices), 1994, 2000, 2003

The Psychopath’s Bible opens with a disclaimer intended as a standard CYA cap, and the next dozen or so pages continue this theme, warning the reader about the hazards of reading the terrible and horrifying material within, which is more than a little over the top for my taste, but entertaining nonetheless. It is primarily compiled of three ‘manuals’ and three appendices. Nicholas Tharcher summed up the basic theme of the book well in the Forward when he said: ‘In some ways this is a book of social philosophy; in other was it is a book of technique. Which it is for you may depend more on your attitude than anything else’ (pg 15).

The first manual is titled ‘The Toxick Magician’ in which very little is given that could be used for practical application and the little theory is a bit dodgy as it is not expounded. Thoughts are left vague and incomplete, perhaps to stimulate further thought and generated ideas on the part of the practitioner, but it looks sloppy and unfinished.

However, I found the second manual, ‘Toxick Calculator’, far more entertaining. It deals with what Hyatt terms the ‘mathematics of power’ and contains more detailed theory, as well as exercises with more practical applications than the first. In it, the reader gets gems like this: ‘We are inherently irrational, although we like to fancy ourselves as rational beings……the truth is simple: we are irrational beings capable of rational thought.’

The third manual, ‘The No-Where University, Sometimes Called P.U.’ contains a selection of courses and literature, both printed and film, that a prospective psychopath will want to fill hirself in on in order to perfect hir transformation.

Much of what is contained within one can see easily reflected all around, friends, co-workers, etc. Particularly in the games played by world leaders. Consider this extract: ‘Build tension in others and help them find a scapegoat. Do this in small and insignificant ways until you have the power and ability to move people to more gross and hideous behaviors. Help people realize how easy it is to lose things they have or want. The trick in all of this is not to become identified as the bearer of bad tidings – unless you are looking for people with a strong stomach’. Sound familiar?

It’s entertaining, an easy read, but at the same time insightful – though not terribly new. There is little that cannot be found within the works of Sun Tzu, Niccolo Machiavelli, Ayn Rand and the like. However, the ideas have been modernized, and deliberately injected with humour, which is fun. Then again, as he says ‘I have written this book in the way I wanted to write it……not for the ease of the reader nor for the sake of favorable reviews’.

For those who have not read much in this genre there is a lot you need to know, namely, you need to understand that ‘no matter how pathetic, everyone is looking out for their best interests. For most people, their best interest consists of not being punished. Few play to win. They play to be safe while feeling morally superior to the winner’, and this is an attitude that severely needs to be corrected if you really want to play the game. This book just might help.


Review: Aleister Crowley’s Illustrated Goetia, by Lon Milo DuQuette and Christopher S. Hyatt

By Psyche | January 30, 2004 | Leave a comment

Aleister Crowley’s Illustrated Goetia: Sexual Evocation, by Lon Milo DuQuette and Christopher S. Hyatt, illustrated by David P. Wilson
New Falcon Publications, 1561840483, 236 pp., 1992, 2000

‘What Goetia is – is the releasing of yourself from your won fears and illusions by direct confrontation.’

According to tradition, the Goetia is the first book in the Lemegaton attributed to Solomon the King, though likely compiled by a host of authors. Goetic evocation deals with the summoning of the seventy-two lesser spirits and demons. In this edition, based on Crowley’s Goetia, DuQuette and Hyatt strip away all unnecessary trappings and cut through most of the ‘fooltraps’ designed to dissuade less astute practitioners.

Traditionally, Goetic evocation calls for strict observance of many details, such as the correct ritual hours, lengthy calls, and an inordinate amount of ceremonial trappings. The authors tell the reader what one can safely do away with, and what can be altered as preference dictates. However, there are some items that the authors do believe are required for the successful (and safer) evocation of the Goetic spirits, including a list of ‘must haves’ with detailed explanations and personal anecdotes as to why they are necessary. Noting ‘that there is absolutely no necessity (nor particular advantage) to blindly conforming with the Conjuration scripts of the ancient texts. The Spirits are no more impressed of you say “thee” and “thine” than they are if you say “you” and “yours”.’

Goetic spirits ‘will work for anyone who knows how to use them. This is one of the horrors people attribute to Goetic workings. You “don’t have to be respectable” for Goetia to work for you. Unlike other magical workings there is no implication that the operator has to be “good” and “holy” to achieve results. This idea in itself violates our model of “right” and “wrong”, “just” and “unjust”. In the Goetic world like in the real world the “bad” can and do prosper. Thus our belief in the moral orders of the Universe appears violated by the simple existence of Spirits who will do the bidding of anyone.’

Though they will work for anyone, the authors caution that one ‘must be completely convinced that your demands are absolutely justified. (And don’t think we are invoking the great demon “morality” here. An unnecessary motive is an unworthy motive – pure and simple). When you are truly justified in your demands then you have the momentum of the entire universe behind you.’

Further cautioning and confirming that ‘yes, they are dangerous,’ DuQuette and Hyatt explain that ‘while they remain unmastered they can surface unbidden and wreak all havoc modern psychology blames on “things hidden in the subconscious mind”.’ As well as a few delightfully thrilling personal anecdotes.

There are a few changes, namely the elimination of lengthy calls in preference for Thelemic invocations from Liber Samech by Crowley, Enochian calls, etc. As well, ‘for the convenience of the modern reader’ the authors have translated information regarding each of the seventy-two Goetic spirits into modern understanding and Crowleyan associations, and ‘where obvious, returned certain Spirits to their original gender.’

Sketches accompany each of the seventy-two spirits, illustrated by artist-clairvoyant David P. Wilson, a practicing Goetic magickian. ‘Over a period of 15 years, he has evoked each of the Spirits at least once…But it is very important for you to remember that, because no two people have the same visual-emotional “vocabulary”, the images of the Goetic universe will be unique to each of us.’ The authors caution the reader not to ‘think that these sketches are what you must see when evoking any particular Spirit,’ instead explaining that ‘they are intended to serve only as springboards to your imagination.’

Though with such a short section on sex magick, I don’t know that it really deserves the ‘Sexual Evocation’ subtitle as there are really only a few pages on it at the rear of the text.

Aimed at those actually interested in actually practicing magick rather than simply reading about it, it gives unambiguous description of what tools are required and the methods of evocation and, briefly, of sexual invocation, cutting through the superfluous and get right to what is necessary. An excellent introduction to Goetic magick as Crowley practiced it.


Review: Rebels and Devils, edited by Christopher S. Hyatt

By Psyche | August 13, 2003 | Leave a comment

Rebels & Devils: The Psychology of Liberation, edited by Christopher S. Hyatt
New Falcon, 1561841536, 428 pp., 1996, 2000

Rebels and Devils is a collection of works from some of the most rebellious and accomplished minds of our time; including such notorious authors as William Burroughs, Phil Hine, Peter Carroll, Austin Osman Spare, Aleister Crowley, Israel Regardie, Robert Anton Wilson, Timothy Leary, Osho, and naturally Christopher S. Hyatt, as well as various others. Not only a collection of essays, it also consists of various photographs, poetry, biographies, interviews and even a comic drawn by S. Jason Black and co-written by Hyatt. Comprised of more than works psychology and magick; anything that could be deemed rebellious or individualistic; also covered are such topics as yoga, meditation, sex, drugs, guns, death, and the difference between rebellion and revolution.

I’ve never read anything by Israel Regardie before, as his most famous works seem centred around the Golden Dawn, and I’ve never had much use for formal magickal orders, so I was somewhat surprised to discover while reading an interview between him and Hyatt (‘The Final Words of a Western Master’) that he was so funny, as I tend to see that sort of thing as being dry work. Both humourous and insightful, he made an excellent point regarding the misconceptions readers have about the authors they read, very one dimensionally, and this certainly helps expand that.

In ‘The Calling of the Holy Whore’, Diana Rose Hartman, the only female author in the entire compendium, offers an intelligently refreshing re-interpretation of the Judeo-Christian myths surrounding Satan/Lucifer in the rebel guise, noting how ‘devil’ and ‘divine’ grew out of the same Indo-European root word devi, and ‘demon’ came from the Greek for genius, daemon. Hart contributes an interesting feminist perspective to rebellion, in embracing the holy whore within ourselves.

Christopher Hyatt reflects on the methods of modern slavery in ‘Who Owns the Planet Earth’:

“While most humans agree that slavery is evil – that the ownership of one human by another is immoral – few humans equate slavery with enforced education, welfare, health, and the idea of a perfect orderly universe. Slavery is usually associated with power over others and with the ability to enforce one’s will on another without the fear of retaliation. Within the “right” of ownership and debt there is a hidden mystery – a metaphysics – a knowledge only available to those with the power to create and enforce their metaphysics. Whenever a new group achieves power, they also inherit the metaphysics and magickally, the ability to use it.”

While Osho notes in ‘Rebellion is the Biggest “YES” Yet’:

“Rebellion is an individual action; it has nothing to do with the crowd. Rebellion has nothing to do with politics, power, violence. Rebellion has something to do with changing your consciousness, your silence, your being. It is a spiritual metamorphosis.”

The myriad of discussions on rebellion and liberation in its various forms make this a book to be treasured for years to come. While not every essay is a shining jewel to be discovered, there is a sufficient number that makes Rebels and Devils defiantly worth reading. I recommend that they be read as they appear, even though one may not be interested in every subject discussed, they do follow a loose sequence.


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