Tag: celtic

Brigid, by Courtney Weber

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Brigid, by Courtney WeberBrigid, by Courtney Weber Brigid: History, Mystery and Magick of the Celtic Goddess, by Courtney Weber Weiser Books, 9781578635672, 247 pp., 2015Courtney Weber is a New York based writer and teacher, Wiccan priestess, and tarot adviser. As her time in college studying theatre came to a close, Weber found herself seeking the guidance of the goddess Brigid to aid her with her creative work. In a bout of writer’s block, she prayed to Brigid for creative inspiration, and her appeals did not go unanswered. In return, Weber offered her dedication in the form of a book.Brigid: History, Mystery, and Magick of the Celtic Goddess is as much a reflection of Weber’s experience in coming to know Brigid as it is a guide book for the beginner devotee of the great Celtic goddess. The book has a bit of everything; historical information, the re-telling of myths, personal narratives, and practical meditations and rituals complete with detailed instructions that often include photographs. I came to the title with little interest in Celtic deities, but a great interest in the feminine divine, and curious as to why so many witches devote themselves to Brid. As Weber notes in the closing of her book, she questioned whether her devotional choice was sincere or merely trendy. As her book reveals, Brigid’s complexity, depth, and reach as a goddess is responsible for her widespread worship. Read More

Trees of the Goddess, by Elen Sentier

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Ogham staves, photo by Jenny BachTrees of the Goddess, by Elen SentierTrees of the Goddess: A New Way of Working with the Ogham, by Elen Sentier Moon Books, 9781782793328, 101 pp., 2014For millennia, trees have been held sacred among indigenous cultures and great civilisations alike. Tree mythology features in all major world religions. Trees speak deeply to our human collective unconscious, as symbols of otherworld connection, longevity, nourishment, and the mysteries of transformation.To the ancient Celts, certain trees held special value as a magickal alphabet known as the oghamTrees of the Goddess is a short book describing these sacred trees in the context of the mystical "Song of Amergin," translated by Robert Graves in The White Goddess. While the ogham’s popular use as a calendar is loosely based on Graves’ work, his interpretation has been disputed (in true Pagan style) as a corruption of original sources. Read More

The Journey into Spirit, by Kristoffer Hughes

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Death and Dying, photo by Wayne WilkinsonThe Journey into Spirit, by Kristoffer HughesThe Journey into Spirit: A Pagan’s Perspective on Death, Dying and Bereavement, by Kristoffer Hughes Llewellyn Publications, 978-0-7387-4075-1, 312 pp., 2014What a gift this book is. From the lyrical quality of Kristoffer Hughes’ writing, not often present in nonfiction, to the sensitive and thoughtful wisdom he imparts, The Journey into Spirit gives the reader a compassionate space to rethink beliefs about death.Hughes is both a Druid priest and a professional pathology technologist who has worked in British morgues for the past quarter-century, and a funeral celebrant and a teacher of death customs and philosophy. He tells us how as a young child watching his first mortuary scene on TV he knew he was destined for a life entwined with death. Although the adults around him at that time were scared and taken aback by his interest, he felt no fear, only a deep respect for the physical process of death and curiosity about the ensuing spiritual transition. This is the perspective he’s carried throughout his life, and from which he has written this book.He frames his views within the three Celtic realms of existence -- the realm of necessity, the realm of spirit and the realm of infinity – and discusses his philosophical conclusions and certain Celtic teachings pertinent to each realm. Read More

The Tradition of Household Spirits, by Claude Lecouteux

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The Tradition of Household Spirits, by Claude LecouteuxThe Tradition of Household Spirits, by Claude LecouteauxThe Tradition of Household Spirits: Ancestral Lore and Practices, by Claude Lecouteux, translated by Jon E. Graham Inner Traditions, 1620551055, 227 pp. (incl. index and eight pages of colour plates), 2013Ever since his first book, Witches, Werewolves and Fairies: Shapeshifters and Astral Doubles in the Middle Ages in 1992, I've quite enjoyed Claude Lecouteux's work.Claude Lecouteux is a French historian specialising in the Middle Ages and its understanding of the spiritual world, the chair of German civilization and Literature of the Middle Ages, and a professor emeritus, at the Paris-Sorbonne University.The Tradition of Household Spirits: Ancestral Lore and Practices was initially published in French in 2000 as La Maison et ses Génies: Croyances d'Hier et d'Aujourd'hui. Personally, I find the French title more apt, since it more clearly describes the content, but that's a fairly minor quibble on my part. In the original French, this was Lecouteux's fifth book published. However the English translation are being published in a different order, and this is the seventh book released in English.The first part of the book begins with the actual house, while the second part of the book turns to the spirits themselves. This is followed by a brief exploration of the notion of haunted houses, and a few appendixes about proverbs associated with household spirits and a few other odds and ends. Read More

Robert Graves’ fabrication of the Celtic tree calendar

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Tree, photo by Romain ValletFor many people, their first introduction to the Song of Amergin came through Robert Graves' The White Goddess.  Graves states that, "English poetic education should, really, begin not with Canterbury Tales, not with the Odyssey, not even with Genesis, but with the Song of Amergin."However, despite this apparently reverential beginning; Graves does not actually put forward the Song of Amergin as we have it; rather he begins by utterly changing this ancient poem to better fit his own pet theory, connecting the lines from this poem to the Ogham alphabet and the "months" of the year.  This creates a vague pattern, unprecedented in either nature or the Gaelic source culture he purports to respect.Graves provides neither the original Irish poem, nor anyone else's English translation. Instead he just sets off on his own imaginative journey. Read More

The Way of the Oracle, by Diana L Paxson

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The Way of the Oracle, by Diana L PaxsonThe Way of the Oracle, by Diana L PaxsonThe Way of the Oracle, by Diana L Paxson Weiser Books, 9781594774904, 247 pp., 2012This book is an excellent follow up to Diana Paxson's previous work, Trance-Portation: Learning to Navigate the Inner World (Weiser Books, 2008).The Way of the Oracle is divided into two parts. The first explores some of the historical evidence for oracular practice in Celtic, Greek, and especially Norse cultures. The second section has more of a DIY how-to quality. Paxson has made a very complicated subject engaging and accessible without ignoring the historical and practical problems that exist.I love that the first section is chalk-full of historical quotes and references paired up with personal anecdotes which connect the background material to lived experience. The historical and mythic examples from Norse and Greek culture are excellent, and the author makes a valiant effort to include Celtic material where possible. Unfortunately, despite having strong traditions of prophesy and second-sight, the Celts did not have many oracular sites, like the Greeks, or travelling oracles with elaborate rituals, like the Norse. While it is not suitable to group ritual, a nod to the tradition of kings, heroes, and regular folk meeting receiving prophesy otherworldly beings at certain times and places (such as late on lonely roads or at dawn on the liminal ramparts) would have been nice. Read More

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