Tag: Buddhism

Tulpas, ethereal muscles and neo-Neolithic long barrows

By Spiral Nature | September 26, 2014 | Leave a comment

Linkage, chain background image by Faramarz Hashemi

Magick

Magicians have a tendency to filter their experiences through human assumptions, and while it’s understandable, there are other factors to consider.

There’s more to tuplas thank you think, and they definitely are not whatever it is that 4chan thinks they are. (Though I’m having a lot of fun picturing Blue Flame Magick making that face.)

A workout regimen for your ethereal muscles.

Love or hate the terminating “k,” it sure does make searching for magick a hell of a lot easier on Google. Continue reading


When is it cultural theft?

By Ian 'Cat' Vincent | September 24, 2014 | Leave a comment

The Shadow (1994)It is, as I noted previously, an inevitability of working with pop culture symbol-sets in magick, that a certain amount of cross-cultural symbolism happens. Often this is condemned by the more purist practitioners as cultural theft; views on this across occulture vary, and the debate is far from over.

I generally fall on the side of the debate that says, Yes, respect cultures, don’t nick their ideas and forms willy-nilly — but once a symbol or practice has become part of common culture, it can’t be put back in the box. And if it’s there, you might as well use it. Once those symbols are enculturated, they evolve, and what they become is no longer quite what they were, and this is often a positive evolution. Continue reading


The Heart of Buddhist Meditation, by Nyanaponika Thera

By Gesigewigu's | September 15, 2014 | Leave a comment

The Heart of Buddhist Meditation, by Nyanaponika TheraThe Heart of Buddhist Meditation, by Nyanaponika TheraThe Heart of Buddhist Meditation: The Buddha’s Way of Mindfulness, by Nyanaponika Thera
Weiser Books, 9781578635580, 257 pp., 1954, 2014

This book is issued in the deep conviction that the systematic cultivation of Right Mindfulness, as taught by the Buddha in his Discourse on Satipatthana, still provides the most simple and direct, the most thorough and effective, method for training and developing the mind for its daily tasks and problems as well as for its highest aim: mind’s own unshakable deliverance from Greed, Hatred and Delusion.

The Heart of Buddhist Meditation is a classic of Western Buddhism from the ’50s, which Weiser has just republished on its 50th anniversary. It’s one of the first serious books on Vipassana meditation written for a Western audience. “This is the book that started it all — the book that, with great clarity and ardour, introduced Vipassana and mindfulness to the West.,” says Jon Kabat-Zinn, author of Mindfulness for Beginners. Continue reading


Words of the magi: an interview with Alan Chapman and Duncan Barford

By Cole Tucker | April 10, 2013 | Leave a comment

Altered States, photo by H Koppdelaney

Alan Chapman and Duncan Barford of The Baptist’s Head and Open Enlightenment were kind enough to answer several questions I put to them.

Did you formulate the Core Practice techniques immediately after attaining the Knowledge & Conversation of the Holy Guardian Angel [K&C], or did it follow your successful crossing of the Abyss?

ALAN: I attained the K&C using a free-form ritual technique, but I came to develop a simpler method based on Father Thomas Keating’s centred prayer as I persisted in invoking the HGA through the years.

The bare-bones Core Practice described in Alan’s essay bears a strong  resemblance to vipassana meditation, and Duncan has mentioned a long-standing interest in Buddhism. In your work, each of you pay homage to Daniel Ingram and his fantastic work. At what point did you pick up the links between wisdom traditions and decide to adopt vipassana into your regular practice? Continue reading


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