Tag: avalonia books

31 occultnik Tumblrs worth following

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Tumblr

Tumblr is a wonderfully interactive social platform that takes blogging back to its roots as a weblog — literally a log of curated stuff found on the Web. Be it photos, images and other art, or links, excerpts from essays, tweets, Facebook screencaps — all liked, shared, and commented upon by hundreds of thousands of users. It’s brilliant.

The platform seems to favour politics, feminists and fandoms, but like any social network — it’s all about who you follow, and my perception here may be skewed by who I tend to interact with. There’s also a ton of great stuff to interest the budding and well experienced occultnik.

I’ve been on Tumblr for a few years now as plutopsyche, but Spiral Nature, as a website, just joined this April. We’re starting to see a pretty good following, but sometimes it can be difficult to find new people.

Recently chirotus responded to a follower looking to find more Pagans to follow on Tumblr, and in response I listed a bunch of the occultnik Tumblrs I follow on Spiral Nature’s account, and I thought I’d share an expanded version of that list with you.

Let me know in the comments if I’ve missed anyone, and share your Tumblr account below! Continue reading


Thoth, by Lesley Jackson

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Thoth, by Lesley JacksonThoth: The History of the Ancient Egyptian God of Wisdom, by Lesley Jackson
Avalonia Books, 9781905297474, 225 pp., 2012

This is a rather unique book in that it does not attempt to be anything other than an attempt to show how Egyptians through the millennia related to Thoth. It isn’t designed to detail the hymns and rituals associated with Thoth, although they do figure into the account. It isn’t about his priesthood or his temples, although they also enter into the account

There are numerous books which relate how the dynastic families of ancient Egypt related to Thoth, but very few which give any indication how commoners saw their interaction with the God of Wisdom in his various functions of scribe, messenger of the gods, protector, and psychopomp . While the average Egyptian might expect that they would never encounter the majority of their gods, Thoth was their guide in the afterlife, and everyone – no matter how high or low their status – would meet him during their transition between life and afterlife. Continue reading