Tag Archives: austin osman spare

Review: Rebels and Devils, edited by Christopher S. Hyatt

By Psyche | August 13, 2003 | Leave a comment

Rebels & Devils: The Psychology of Liberation, edited by Christopher S. Hyatt
New Falcon, 1561841536, 428 pp., 1996, 2000

Rebels and Devils is a collection of works from some of the most rebellious and accomplished minds of our time; including such notorious authors as William Burroughs, Phil Hine, Peter Carroll, Austin Osman Spare, Aleister Crowley, Israel Regardie, Robert Anton Wilson, Timothy Leary, Osho, and naturally Christopher S. Hyatt, as well as various others. Not only a collection of essays, it also consists of various photographs, poetry, biographies, interviews and even a comic drawn by S. Jason Black and co-written by Hyatt. Comprised of more than works psychology and magick; anything that could be deemed rebellious or individualistic; also covered are such topics as yoga, meditation, sex, drugs, guns, death, and the difference between rebellion and revolution.

I’ve never read anything by Israel Regardie before, as his most famous works seem centred around the Golden Dawn, and I’ve never had much use for formal magickal orders, so I was somewhat surprised to discover while reading an interview between him and Hyatt (‘The Final Words of a Western Master’) that he was so funny, as I tend to see that sort of thing as being dry work. Both humourous and insightful, he made an excellent point regarding the misconceptions readers have about the authors they read, very one dimensionally, and this certainly helps expand that.

In ‘The Calling of the Holy Whore’, Diana Rose Hartman, the only female author in the entire compendium, offers an intelligently refreshing re-interpretation of the Judeo-Christian myths surrounding Satan/Lucifer in the rebel guise, noting how ‘devil’ and ‘divine’ grew out of the same Indo-European root word devi, and ‘demon’ came from the Greek for genius, daemon. Hart contributes an interesting feminist perspective to rebellion, in embracing the holy whore within ourselves.

Christopher Hyatt reflects on the methods of modern slavery in ‘Who Owns the Planet Earth’:

“While most humans agree that slavery is evil – that the ownership of one human by another is immoral – few humans equate slavery with enforced education, welfare, health, and the idea of a perfect orderly universe. Slavery is usually associated with power over others and with the ability to enforce one’s will on another without the fear of retaliation. Within the “right” of ownership and debt there is a hidden mystery – a metaphysics – a knowledge only available to those with the power to create and enforce their metaphysics. Whenever a new group achieves power, they also inherit the metaphysics and magickally, the ability to use it.”

While Osho notes in ‘Rebellion is the Biggest “YES” Yet’:

“Rebellion is an individual action; it has nothing to do with the crowd. Rebellion has nothing to do with politics, power, violence. Rebellion has something to do with changing your consciousness, your silence, your being. It is a spiritual metamorphosis.”

The myriad of discussions on rebellion and liberation in its various forms make this a book to be treasured for years to come. While not every essay is a shining jewel to be discovered, there is a sufficient number that makes Rebels and Devils defiantly worth reading. I recommend that they be read as they appear, even though one may not be interested in every subject discussed, they do follow a loose sequence.


Review: Condensed Chaos, by Phil Hine

By Psyche | July 26, 2003 | Leave a comment

Condensed Chaos: An Introduction to Chaos Magic, by Phil Hine
New Falcon, 156184117X, 191 pp., 1995, 2003

Condensed Chaos opens by describing magic as being about change, not merely the “Magick is the Science and Art of causing Change to occur in conformity with Will” Crowley spoke of, but a more refined version, describing it more in terms of liberation, saying “Through magic we may come to explore the possibilities of freedom”. Then moves into a brief history of chaos magick, from Austin Osman Spare to Crowley to Carroll to Eris and Discordianism, laying the groundwork for chaos magick as we’ve come to know it and how it got that way.

Six “Core Principles of Chaos Magic” are outlined, the first being “Avoidance of Dogmatism’” while somewhat ironic in a list of “core principles” is a common ideal, and indeed few chaotes would contest these points. The fourth principle especially, “Diverse Approaches”, is another reoccurring theme in chaos magick. As Hine sagely notes: “If you use only one magical model, sooner or later the Universe will present you with something that won’t fit your parameters.” Though he also recognizes that “Chaos Magick not about discarding all rules and restraints, but the process of discovering the most effective guidelines and disciplines which enable you to effect change in the world.”

While liberation and freedom are possible, it does not come without possible consequence, as described in the section on dangers and pitfalls. Hine covers many of the possible hazards of magickal practice, detailing what to look out for and what to avoid, adequately preparing the would-be practitioner as much as possible, or at the very least, letting hir know what might be expected, and how to recognize signs of idiocy. Sensibly, he does this before getting into discussion of techniques, and even advises taking breaks as needed.

Hine uses numerous cute acronyms, such as ‘C.H.A.O.S.’, ‘D.R.A.T.’, ‘S.P.L.I.F.F.’, ‘A. P.I.E.’, etc. to abbreviate formulae and concepts, effectively making them easy to remember.

Instructions are given for servitor creation, programming, launching via various methods as well as practical examples for servitors successfully launched in various workshops and lectures. It contains relatively few straight rituals, mostly suggestions and comments, taking information approach rather than an instruction manual which force feeds information. Hine stresses flexibility without seeming wishy-washy, or being overly ridged, effectively maintaining that fine balance between the two extremes.

One thing that did annoy me was the over-emphasis given on how one appears to others. Adapting yourself to suit others to give in to what they want to see in the hopes that they will perceive greatness in you, while the method may work, why anyone would want to do such a thing in the first place? Pleasing the outside world to please yourself doesn’t sit well with me, perhaps it’s the years of reading Objectivist literature or hanging out with Satanists, but it did made something in me twinge. Fortunately, it’s not a dominating feature in the book, and does stress self-evaluation and trying to maintain an honest view of oneself.

This is definitely a ‘should-have’ introductory text covering a wide variety of topics from the practical aspects of magick: dream recall, sigil, servitors, etc., to the more esoteric theories and suggestions as to why things work the way they do – and why not. An excellent introduction to chaos magick, and magick in general.


Models of Magic

By Frater U.: D.: | December 14, 2002 | 7 comments

In the course of exploring the possibilities of new, more efficient techniques of magic I was struck by the fact that a structuralist view of the history of magic to date might prove helpful. After all, magicians have always aspired to restate the theory and practice of magic in the language of their times i.e. in different models pertaining to current world views.

There is, however, some risk involved in such an approach: models do not really explain anything, they are only illustrations of processes, albeit rather useful ones. What’s more, over-systematization tends to obfuscate more than it clarifies and one should not mistake the map for the landscape anyway, a fallacy a great many kabbalists seem to be prone to.

Thus, the following five (or rather: four plus one) models of magic should be seen as a means of understanding the practical possibilities of various magical systems rather than as definitive theories and/or explanations of the way magic works.

It has proved effective in practice to view magic under the following categories:

  • The Spirit Model
  • The Energy Model
  • The Psychological Model
  • The Information Model
  • The Meta-Model

The Spirit Model

This is purportedly the oldest model of magic though it may very well have come into existence after or simultaneously with the energy model. We can find it worldwide in shamanic cultures as well as in many religions. Its basic premise is the existence of an otherworld inhabited by more or less autonomous entities such as spirits, angels, demons, gods etc. The shaman or magician is someone who can enter this otherworld at will, who has travelled widely in it, knows its language and customs and has made friends, smitten enemies and/or acquired allies and servitors there. This is important as all magic is of these entities’ making. The modern German word for witch, “Hexe” (f.) illustrates this rather neatly if we take a closer look at its etymology. It derives from Old High German “hagazussa” which translates as “fence rider”. The hagazussa is riding the “fence between the worlds” i.e. she is at home in the world of everyday life as well as in the magical otherworld of spirits.

In the spirit model magic is seen as being effected by these entities who are usually invisible, at least to the average punter, and it is the shaman’s or magician’s task to make them put his will into effect. This may be done by prayer, by barter, by cajoling or even – vide medieval demon magic – by the application of magical force, threats and pressure.

The otherworld may have its own geography but it is usually considered to coexist with the world of everyday life. The key to entering it is an altered state of consciousness, controlled trance or ecstasy of which the shaman is an expert.

The spirit model has prevailed in traditionalist or Dogmatic magic until today, some of its most noted exponents being Franz Bardon and, at least to a great extent, Aleister Crowley.

The Energy Model

The rise of the energy model in the West is marked primarily by the appearance of Mesmerism towards the end of the 18th century. Anton Mesmer, who was not an occultist but who was on the other hand regarded by his contemporaries to be a “miracle worker” of sorts, rediscovered amongst other things the ancient healing disciplines of hypnosis and magnetism. He popularized his theory of “animal magnetism” which he saw as a subtle force inherent in organisms, but he also made heavy use of metal magnets for healing purposes.

While the French Revolution put a temporary end to Mesmer’s movement, his ideas were not lost. They were taken up by a number of others, primarily occultists, who drew on them while developing their own theories of magic. One of the first to do so was Bulwer Lytton of the Societas Rosicruciana in Anglia (SRIA), who postulated the existence of a subtle energy which he termed Vril, possibly deriving from Latin virilitas or “force, power, strength”. (This was actually the model for the naming of Bovril, from Latin “bovis” or “ox”, and Vril or “life force”.) We can observe interesting parallels to this concept in the vitalist theories of biology which emerged around the same time. Other exponents of the energy model of magic (not then so termed) were Reichenbach with his concept of Od, Eliphas Levi and his Astral Light and Mme. Blavatsky, who adopted the theories of Prana from Yoga physiology. This was also the time when anthropology and ethnology discovered the Polynesian concept of Mana and Asiatic scholars began to concern themselves with the Chinese principle of Ki or Ch’i (Chi). The latter two go to show, of course, that the idea of subtle energies utilized by magic is far older than the 18th century. In fact, we can observe it already in early shamanic cultures. Shamanic magic is very frequently a mixture between spirit and energy model, e.g. the shaman may call upon his spirits or gods to give him “power” or he may, vice versa, use his power to extort favours from them.

In its pure form, however, the shaman or magician is not in need of spirits and other entities. The world is viewed as being “vitalized” by subtle forces or energies and his primary task consists in mastering the art of perceiving and manipulating them. As all phenomena are basically energetic in nature, the existence of an otherworld is not strictly required. Thus, the magician is more of an “energy dancer” than a “fence rider” or go-between. But even here the key to the perception, charging and general utilization of these forces is again the magical trance or, as Chaos Magic terms it, gnosis.

Theories and practices pertaining to the energy model can be found with many magical authors but it has seen its real, large scale popularity only since the seventies of our century when the general influx of Eastern thinking (pace the Hippie movement) made concepts such as chakra and kundalini work a mainstay of most occult disciplines. Strong energy model elements can also be found in Franz Bardon’s system of “electromagnetic fluids”, “condensators” etc.

The Psychological Model

Sigmund Freud’s theory of the subconscious revolutionized Western thinking in general and psychology (which he did not, as some people are wont to believe, invent all by himself) in particular. Suddenly, man was seen as a being which was only partially conscious and in control of itself. While psychology is still fighting for its academical recognition as a science, it has stamped its mark on therapeutic disciplines – and on magic.

The psychological model of magic does not purport to explain how magic works, its only premise is that the subconscious (or, as Carl Jung later retagged it, the unconscious) will do the job if it is properly addressed and/or conditioned. This again is achieved by magical trance, suggestion and the use of symbols (i.e. selective sensory input) as tools of association and as a means of communication between the magician’s conscious will and his subconscious faculty responsible for putting it into effect.

Aleister Crowley dabbled a great deal in the psychological model which comes as no surprise as he not only tried to keep up with all major academic disciplines of his time but thought himself to be the world’s greatest psychologist into the bargain. But all considered he remained a traditionalist exponent of the spirit model: after all Aiwass was, in his belief, a praeternatural entity. Nevertheless he did have a knack of explaining magic in psychological terms to make it sound sensible to the sceptics of his time.

A more radical approach was taken by Austin Osman Spare whose sigil magic rests on the basic tenets of the psychological model. Spare’s brilliant system is in principle an inversion of Freud’s theory of complexes: by actively suppressing his will in the form of a graphical sigil and forgetting it, the magician creates an artificial “complex” which then starts to work on similar lines just as suppressed, subconscious traumas will cause neurotic behaviour etc.

The psychological magician is a programmer of symbols and different states of consciousness. He is not necessarily in need of a transcendent otherworld or even subtle energies, though in practice he will usually work on the assumption that one or the other (or both) do in fact exist and can be utilized by his subconscious.

Authors such as Israel Regardie, Dion Fortune, William Butler, Francis King, William Gray and to some extent Pete Carroll subscribe to the psychological model which seems to be the primary domain of the English speaking world of magic and which has become the prevailing paradigm ever since the seventies of this century.

The Information Model

The information model of magic is being developed since about 1987 and there is still considerable debate about the direction it shall ultimately take. Its basic premises to date are as follows:

  1. Energy as such is “dumb”: it needs information on what to do; this can be so called laws of nature or direct commands.
  2. Information does not have mass or energy. Thus, it is faster than light and not bound by the restrictions of the Einsteinian spacetime continuum. It can therefore be transmitted or tapped at all times and at all places. In analogy (but of course only as such!) it may be likened to quantum phenomena rather than relativistic mass-energy. It can, however, attach itself to a medium e.g. an organism or any other memory storage device.

At the start of the theoretical debate it was still believed that the postulation of morphic (or, more precisely, morphogenetic) fields as hypothesized by Rupert Sheldrake had to be an essential factor by way of explaining the mode of actual information transmittance. This, however, while still being discussed, does not appear to be strictly prerogative though it cannot be not ruled out that an act of information magic may create such fields. It does seem more probable, though, that the concept of information matrices will prove to be the most promising theory in the long run.

The application of the as yet evolving information model has led to the discipline I have termed Cybermagic (from “cybernetics” or the “science of control systems”). Contrary to the other models described above, Cybermagic does not rely on magical trance to achieve its effects. Rather, the Cybermagician activates either his own main memory banks, namely brain and spine (the Golf-club chakra, so-called because of its shape reminiscent of a golf-club) or those of the target person. The desired information is then called up and transmitted quite similarly to a copy command on an MS-DOS computer. The copy command analogy holds good insofar as the information (not having mass) is not actually “lost” in the process (as energy would be) but rather is duplicated. This is an important point as it allows for the magician to perform his magic even in a state of very low physical power, possibly even when almost completely intoxicated, as long as his basic “life support systems” are still functional and the command syntax is employed correctly.

It is, however, obvious that this technique demands a fair control of what used to be termed kundalini effects and practice has shown ever and again that a good amount of Yoga and meditation experience is a great help in achieving to Cybermagic.

Unfortunately, the full theory and practice of Cybermagic cannot be described here due to lack of space and will thus have to be the subject of a separate article to be published later. To date the main experimental research work is being done within the Magical Pact of the Illuminates of Thanateros (IOT) and some quite astounding results have already been achieved, especially in the field of language and knowledge transfer as well as magical healing.

In spite of its very modern, untraditionalist outlook the basic principles of Cybermagic may in truth well be the oldest form of magic extant. For we can, for example, find a number of reports in the East to the effect of a guru transferring all his knowledge to his successor before his death, which is usually achieved by an act of long, mutual meditation.

This goes to show that magic as a whole has always existed in many, coexisting models. What has changed, however, is the stress laid on one model or the other in the course of time.

The Meta-Model

The meta-model of magic is not a model as such but rather an instruction on the use of the others. For its only advice to the magician is: “Always use the model most adequate to your aims.” This may sound a bit trite but we will see that it is not quite as selfevident amongst magicians as one might expect. It is rooted in Chaos magic’s assertion “Nothing is true. Everything is permitted”, which ultimately boils down to pragmatic utilitarianism. Before this aspect is enlarged upon, though, let us look at an example of the models presented here as applied in practice.

We shall take the situation of magical healing to demonstrate how these models differ from each other.

In the spirit model healing is regarded as an exorcism: illness is caused by “evil” or, at least, undesired entities which have to be neutralized and removed by the shaman or magician. In the case of a patient with a heart condition the shaman may, for example, “see” a green lizard in the vicinity of the heart which must be removed. To achieve this the shaman will usually call upon the help of his own spirits who will then handle the matter. Properly exorcised, the patient has been freed from the cause of his ailment and can recuperate.

In the energy model ailments are seen to be caused by energetic imbalance. Thus, our heart patient may have too much (or too little) “fire energy” in his heart chakra, and the magician’s task consists of restoring that balance of energies commonly defined as “health”. This he may do by laying on hands, by using crystals and precious stones, by magnetism or chakra massage etc. The balance having been restored, the patient is regarded as having been healed.

In the psychological model illness is considered to be basically psychosomatic in nature. The magician will, therefore, either do a ritual work with the patient which enhances his stamina and resolves his troubles (e.g. a Saturn ritual to cope with “Saturnian challenges” the patient is seen to have avoided by becoming ill) or he will charge a sigil for the patient’s health. Preferably he will instruct the patient to construct and charge his own sigil.

In the information model the Cybermagician will transmit an informational “healing matrix” into the patient’s system (or somehow create a “morphic field” of health and self-healing) and let the patient’s energies take it from there to do the job of their own accord i.e. automatically. This rests on the assumption that the energies are still powerful enough to get the work done, otherwise he will either jump back into the energy model to provide the patient with the additional energies required or install another information matrix to create an influx of the power desired.

Following the meta-model the magician will decide beforehand in which paradigm he will begin his operation. This must not necessarily exclude the possibility of shifting the paradigms in midwork or of blending them, of course. Usually, the decision is taken on the lines of expediency, efficiency and personal preference. Thus, I personally find healing work with patients easier within the spirit or energy model, while I do seem to get better results with selfhealing employing either the psychological or the information model. Then again, cybermagical work tends to take up to two days to show noticeable effects so that it may be more expedient to go for laying on hands when pain is very acute.

Another important point is the time factor. While traditionalist rituals in the spirit model may take from half a day to weeks and even months, operations in the energy model seldomly take much longer than a few hours at the most. If we take Spare’s sigil magic as an example for a very fast technique within the psychological model, the operation can be over and done with within five to ten minutes. Information magical operations on the other hand only take up about three quarters of a second, a time span which can be cut even shorter by an experienced Cybermagician.

Self evident as the meta-model may seem, in practice many people seem to feel somewhat uncomfortable with its inherent relativism. This is very much the case with beginners in magic. A typical dialogue on the subject might run on the following lines:

“Are there spirits?”
“In the spirit model, yes.”
“And in the energy model?”
“In the energy model there are subtle energy forms.”
“And what about the psychological model?”
“Well, in the psychological model we are dealing with projections of the subconscious.”
“What happens in the information model, then?”
“In the information model there are information clusters.”
“Yes, but are there spirits now or not?”
“In the spirit model, yes.”

This logical loop is, of course, usually experienced as a pretty frustrating exercise; but while the asker claims that the magician is trying to avoid the issue he is at the same time overlooking the fact that he himself is basically only restating the old yen for absolute, “objective” truths – not really a quantum magical approach, to say the least. However, the aspiring cyberpunk magician of today cannot expect to be spared the pains of coming to terms with the notion that freedom and dogma are mutually exclusive.

UBIQUE DAEMON .’. UBIQUE DEUS .’.

(c) copyright 1991 by Frater U.’.D.’. All rights reserved.
==================================================================
Frater U.’.D.’., one of Germany’s leading exponents of contemporary
magic, is the author of “PRACTICAL SIGIL MAGIC” and
“SECRETS OF THE GERMAN SEX MAGICIANS” (forthcoming). The essay
above will be part of his next book, “DANCE OF THE PARADIGMS.
A CHAOS MAGICK PRIMER.”
(All books: LLEWELLYN’s PUBLICATIONS, St. Paul, Minn.)
=================================================================

* Origin: ChaosBox: Nichts ist wahr, Alles ist erlaubt. (2:243/2)


Defining Chaos

By Mark Chao (Jaq D. Hawkins) | October 9, 2001 | 1 comment

Introduction

Chaos, according to the `Oxford English Dictionary’ means:

  1. A gaping void, yawning gulf, chasm, or abyss.
  2. The ‘formless void’ of primordial matter, the `great deep’ or ‘abyss’ out of which the cosmos or order of the universe was evolved.

There are a couple of additional definitions, but they are irrelevant to this discussion. When chaos is used in magic, there is no place for confusion or disorder.

Chaos is the creative principle behind all magic. When a magical ritual is performed, regardless of “tradition” or other variables in the elements of the performance, a magical energy is created and put into motion to cause something to happen. In his book, Sorcery as Virtual Mechanics, Stephen Mace cites a scientific precedent for this creative principle:

I quote:

‘To keep it simple, let us confine our example to just two electrons, the point like carriers of negative charge. Let us say they are a part of the solar wind – beta particles, as it were – streaming out from the sun at thousands of miles a second. Say that these two came close enough that their negative charges interact, causing them to repel one another. How do they accomplish this change in momentum?

‘According to quantum electrodynamics, they do it by exchanging a “virtual” photon. One electron spawns it, the other absorbs it, and so do they repel each other. The photon is “virtual” because it cannot be seen by an outside observer, being wholly contained in the interaction. But it is real enough, and the emission and absorption of virtual photons is how the electromagnetic interaction operates.

‘The question which is relevant to our purpose here is where does the photon come from. It does not come out of one electron and lodge in the other, as if it were a bullet fired from one rock into another. The electrons themselves are unchanged, except for their momenta. Rather, the photon is created out of nothing by the strain of the interaction. According to current theory, when the two electrons come close, their waveforms interact, either cancelling out or reinforcing one another. Waveforms are intimately tied to characteristics like electric charge, and we could thus expect the charges on the two electrons to change. But electron charge does not vary; it is always 1.602 x 10(-19) coulombs. Instead, the virtual photons appear out of the vacuum and act to readjust the system. The stress spawns them and by their creation is the stress resolved.’

Austin Spare understood this principle in regard to magical phenomena long before scientists discovered photons or began experiments in the area of chaos science.

Austin Osman Spare – Some History

Austin Spare was born at midnight, Dec. 31st, 1886 in a London suburb called Snow Hill. His father was a London policeman, often on night duty.

Spare showed a natural talent for drawing at an early age, and in 1901 – 1904 left school to serve an apprenticeship in a stained glass works, but continued his education at Art College in Lambeth. In 1904 he won a scholarship to the Royal College of Art. In that year he also exhibited a picture in the Royal Academy for the first time.

In 1905 he published his first book, Earth Inferno. It was primarily meant to be a book of drawings, but included commentaries that showed some of his insights and spiritual leanings. John Singer Sargent hailed him as a genius at age 17. At an unspecified time in his adolescence, Spare was initiated into a witch cult by a sorceress named Mrs. Paterson, whom Spare referred to as his “second mother”. In 1908 he held an exhibition at Bruton Gallery. In 1910 he spent a short time as a member of Crowley’s Argentium Astrum. The association did not last long. Crowley was said to have considered Spare to be a Black Magician. In 1909 Spare began creation of The Book of Pleasure.

In 1912 his reputation was growing rapidly in the art world. In 1913 he published The Book of Pleasure. It is considered to be his most important magical work, and includes detailed instructions for his system of sigilisation and the “death postures” that he is well-known for. In 1914 – 1918 he served as an official war artist. He was posted to Egypt which had a great effect on him. In 1921, he published Focus of Life, another book of drawings with his unique and magical commentaries. In 1921 – 1924 Spare was at the height of his artistic success, then, in 1924 he published the Anathema of Zos, in which he effectively excommunicated himself from his false and trendy artistic “friends” and benefactors. He returned to South London and obscurity to find the freedom to develop his philosophy, art and magic.

In 1947 Spare met Kenneth Grant and became actively involved with other well-known occultists of the period. In 1948 – 1956 he began work on a definitive Grimoire of the Zos Kia Cultus, which is referred to in his various writings. This is unfinished and is being synthesized from Spare’s papers by Kenneth Grant, who inherited all of Spare’s papers. Much of this information was included in Images and Oracles of Austin Osman Spare by Kenneth Grant, but there are some unpublished works which Grant plans to publish after completion of his Typhonian series.

References for this section are mostly from Christopher Bray’s introduction to The Collected Works of Austin Osman Spare (Sorcerer’s Apprentice) and from Excess Spare, which is a compilation by the Temple ov Psychic Youth of photocopied articles about Spare from various sources.

The Magic of Austin Osman Spare

Spare’s art and magic were closely related. It is reputed that there are messages in his drawings about his magical philosophy. One particular picture of Mrs. Paterson has reportedly been seen to move; the eyes opening and closing. Spare is best known for his system of using sigils. Being an artist, he was very visually oriented.

The system basically consists of writing down the desire, preferably in your own magical alphabet, eliminating all repeated letters, then forming a design of the remaining single letters. The sigil must then be charged. There is a variety of specific ways to do this, but the key element is to achieve a state of “vacuity” which can be done through exhaustion, sexual release or several other methods.

This creates a vacuum or “void” much like the condition described in the introduction to this discussion, and it is filled with the energy of the magician. The sigil, being now charged, must be forgotten so that the sub-conscious mind may work on it without the distractions and dissipation of energy that the conscious mind is subject to. Spare recognised that magic comes from the sub-conscious mind of the magician, not some outside “spirits” or “gods”.

Christopher Bray has this to say about Spare’s methods in his introduction to The Collected Works of Austin Osman Spare;

‘So in his art and writing, Spare is putting us in the mood; or showing by example what attitude we need to adopt to approach the “angle of departure of consciousness” in order to enter the infinite. What pitch of consciousness we need to gain success.

‘One must beware making dogma, for Spare went to great pains to exclude it as much as possible to achieve success in his magic; however a number of basic assumptions underpin chaos magic.

‘Chaos is the universal potential of creative force, which is constantly engaged in trying to seep through the cracks of our personal and collective realities. It is the power of Evolution/Devolution.

‘Shamanism is innate within every one of us and can be tapped if we qualify by adjusting, our perception/attitude and making our being ready to accept the spontaneous. Achieving Gnosis, or hitting the “angle of departure of consciousness and time”, is a knack rather than a skill.’

There are other methods to utilise the same concept that Spare explains for us. Magicians since Spare have written about their own methods and expansions of his method quite frequently in occult magazines, mostly in Great Britain. Spare is certainly not the first person in history to practise this sort of magic, but he is credited with the first associations to magic, of the word chaos.

Chaos since A.O.S.

Austin Spare died May 15, 1956, but his magic did not die with him. There have been select groups of magicians practising versions of Chaos ever since, especially in Northern England and Germany. In the late l970′s, Ray Sherwin was editor and publisher of a magazine called The New Equinox. Pete Carroll was a regular contributor to the magazine, and together, due to dissatisfaction with the magical scene in Britain at the time, they formed the “Illuminates of Thanateros”. They advertised in New Equinox and a group formed. Part of the intention of the group was to have an Order where degrees expressed attainment rather than authority, and hierarchy beyond just organisational requirements was non-existent.

At some point, about 1986, Ray Sherwin “excommunicated himself” because he felt that the Order was slipping into the power structure that he had intended to avoid with this group, and Pete Carroll became known as the leader of “The Pact”. The IOT continues to survive and was identified as the only international Chaos organisation until early 90′s.

There are smaller groups of Chaos practitioners, as well as individuals practising alone. Chaos since Spare has taken on a life of its own. It will always continue to grow, that is its nature. It was only natural that eventually the world of science would begin to discover the physical principles underlying magic, although the scientists who are making these discoveries still do not realise that this is what they are doing. It is interesting that they have had the wisdom to call it chaos science…

Chaos Science

Modern chaos science began in the 1960′s when a handful of open-minded scientists with an eye for pattern realised that simple mathematical equations fed into a computer could model patterns every bit as irregular and “chaotic” as a waterfall. They were able to apply this to weather patterns, coastlines, and all sorts of natural phenomena. Particular equations would result in pictures resembling specific types of leaves, the possibilities were incredible. Centres and institutes were founded to specialise in “non-linear dynamics” and “complex systems”. Natural phenomena, like the red spot of Jupiter, could now be explained. The common catch-terms that most people have heard by now – strange attractors, fractals, etc, are related to the study of turbulence in nature. There is not room to go into these subjects in depth here, and I recommend that those who are interested in this subject read Chaos: Making a New Science by James Gleick.

What we are concerned with here is how all this relates to magic. Many magicians, especially Chaos Magicians, have begun using the terms, “fractal” and “strange attractor”, in their everyday conversations. Most of those who do this have some understanding of the relationship between magic and this area of science. To put it very simply, a successful magical act causes an apparently acausal result. In studying turbulence, chaos scientists have realised that apparently acausal phenomena in nature are not only the norm, but are measurable by simple mathematical equations. Irregularity is the stuff life is made of. For example, in the study of heartbeat rhythms and brainwave patterns, irregular patterns are measured from normally functioning organs, while steady, regular patterns are a direct symptom of a heart attack about to occur, or an epileptic fit. Referring back again to “virtual” photons, a properly executed magical release of energy creates a “wave form” (visible by Kirlian photography) around the magician causing turbulence in the aetheric space. This turbulence will likely cause a result, preferably as the magician has intended. Once the energy is released, control over the phenomena is out of the magician’s hands, just as once the equation has been fed into the computer, the design follows the path set for it.

The scientists who are working in this area would scoff at this explanation, they have no idea that they are in the process of discovering the physics behind magic. But then, many common place sciences of today, chemistry for example, were once considered to be magic. Understanding this subject requires, besides some reading, a shift in thinking. We are trained from an early age to think in linear terms, but nature and the chaos within it are non-linear, and therefore require non-linear thinking to be understood. This sounds simple, yet it reminds me of a logic class I had in college. We were doing simple Aristotelian syllogisms. All we had to do was to put everyday language into equation form. It sounds simple, and it is. However, it requires non-linear thought process. During that lesson over the space of a week, the class size dropped from 48 to 9 students. The computer programmers were the first to drop out. Those of us who survived that section went on to earn high grades in the class, but more importantly, found that we had achieved a permanent change in our thinking processes. Our lives were changed by that one simple shift of perspective.

Chaos science is still in the process of discovery, yet magicians have been applying its principles for at least as long as they have been writing about magic. Once the principles of this science began to take hold on the thinking process, the magician begins to notice everything from the fractal patterns in smoke rising from a cigarette to the patterns of success and failure in magical workings, which leads to an understanding of why it had succeeded or failed.

Defining Chaos Magic

Chaos is not in itself, a system or philosophy. It is rather an attitude that one applies to one’s magic and philosophy. It is the basis for all magic, as it is the primal creative force. A Chaos Magician learns a variety of techniques, usually as many as s/he can gain access to, but sees beyond the systems and dogmas to the physics behind the magical force and uses whatever methods are appealing to him/herself. Chaos does not come with a specific Grimoire or even a prescribed set of ethics. For this reason, it has been dubbed “left hand path” by some who choose not to understand that which is beyond their own chosen path. There is no set of specific spells that are considered to be “Chaos Magic Spells”. A Chaos Magician will use the same spells as those of other paths, or those of his/her own making. Any and all methods and information are valid, the only requirement is that it works. Mastering the role of the sub-conscious mind in magical operations is the crux of it, and the state called “vacuity” by Austin Osman Spare is the road to that end. Anyone who has participated in a successful ritual has experienced the “high” that this state induces.

An understanding of the scientific principles behind magic does not necessarily require a college degree in physics (although it wouldn’t hurt much, if the linear attitude drilled into the student could be by-passed). Experience in magical results will bring the necessary understanding.

This essay is directed toward the increasing numbers of people who have been asking, “What is Chaos Magic?” It is very basic and by no means intended to be a complete explanation of any of the elements discussed. Many of the principles of magic must be self-discovered. My only intent here is to try to define and pull together the various elements associated with Chaos Magic into an intelligible whole. For those of you who wish to learn more about this subject, I have prepared a suggested reading list, however, I must emphasise that there are always more sources than any one person knows about, so do not limit yourself to this list. Chaos has no limits…

  • The Book of Pleasure, by Austin Osman Spare
  • Anathema of Zos, by Austin Osman Spare
  • A Book of Satyrs, by Austin Osman Spare
  • Images and Oracles of Austin Osman Spare, by Kenneth Grant
  • The Early Works of A.O.S., Excess Spare and Stations in Time are three collections which are available from TOPY.
  • Chaos: Making a New Science, by James Gleick
  • Turbulent Mirror, by John Briggs & F. David Peat
  • Liber Null & Psychonaut, by Peter J. Carroll
  • Practical Sigil Magick, by Frater U.D.
  • Condensed Chaos, by Phil Hine

For an expansion of the overview expressed in this essay:


Smuggling Sigils Across: Sigil Magic for the Professional Magician

By Areosol | July 20, 2001 | Leave a comment

[SI will assume that you are already initiated into the secrets of Austin Spare's sigil magic.

Consulting with my clients as a professional magician, I am always confronted with the same question: Is the client's will identical with my own ?

If it is, there should be no problem involved in charging the sigil in the client's stead by myself. (The client, one must remember, will usually not be familiar with the basic tenets of sigil magic or even magic in general and will probably hesitate to try it out for himself.) However, I believe as a matter of principle that everybody should vaccinate his will for himself. I do not feel happy with charging myself i.e. my subconscious with other people's desires. For example: if Mrs. X wants to be brought together with Mr. Y by a sigil (love spell), it could be intersting to know what might happen if the pertinent sigil were charged by myself.

Accordingly I had to find a means to implant sigils into my individual clients in such a way that they are not aware of what they are really doing. At first, talking with the client, I will try to find the "smallest common denominator" out of a tangled mass of multiple desires. This will continue until the client is able to word his or her statement of will (henceforth to be termed "will sentence") in plain and unambiguous language. Following this all contact between the client and myself will be abandoned for two or tree weeks. In the meantime I will construct the sigil, usually employing the word method, and sketch it on a piece of parchment. Very often the client`s name will be encoded applying the magical camea of the planet pertinent to the client`s desire. I may then supplement the sigil with this personalised glyph. Then I will outline a short ritual for the client in which will be hidden the charge proper of the sigil (employing either the mantric method or a variation of the so-called "death posture").

After a while I will send the client this constructed sigil by mail including instructions on how to charge it plus possible additional admonitions, if necessary. Most probably the client will have forgotten the precise wording of his/her will sentence by now; neither will he or she be able to draw any conclusions from these strange glyphs. After having been charged the sigil can be sealed and constantly worn in a locket, it can also be put permanently in view e.g. as a wall decoration. Some of my clients have placed or hung their sigils nicely framed in their office rooms.

To charge a sigil the following method is very effective.

The client arrives for consultation. In some cases has to bring along some substance imbibed with his or her Od. During a small ritual client must close his/her eyes and place the odic substance on the sigil which will be lying open in front of him/her. Then I will take the client`s finger and prick it quickly and sharply with a small chirurgical lancet. After the blooddrop has been smeared onto the sigil, the latter will be folded and sealed immediately. I then admonish the client to bear in mind that this talisman must never get into other people`s hands.

This charging method is especially effective in working with protection or "antipersonnel mine" sigils.

Here are some examples relating to client`s feedback:

 30.04. Sigil as wall decoration
 24.06. Business enterprises developed well.

 12.07. Protection/defence sigil, charged employing chirurgical lancet.
 14.07. Client feels well and secure.

 23.06. Sigil as a defense "antipersonnel mine" with codification of
        client`s name by the magical camea of Mars, charged with
        lancet.

09.10. "Mine" fully operative: sickness and accidents of 2-3
        enemies.

 11.10. Sigil employed as a wall decoration.
    11. Business successful. Sale of real estate to a monastry (!)
        has been agreed upon.

 27.12. Sigil, mantric charge.
 14.02. Client`s partner becomes more friendly and loving.
 18.03. Partnership satisfactory.

 17.06. Sigil charged spastically by myself in client`s stead.
 18.06. Shortly before the potential buyer arrived for inspection in
        the afternoon, the last seat in the coffeehouse (sales
        object) had been taken, suggesting excellent business;
        immediately after inspection number of customers decreased
        again.

 07.12. Fast charge of a "combat sigil".
 21.12. The idea incorporated by the sigil incarnates as a conscious
        wish in the target person`s love partner.

YOUHAVEJUSTLEFTTHESIGILUNIVERSE

/   / /////  /// /// //

* Origin: ChaosBox: Nothing is true -> all is allowed… (2:243/2)


Page 3 of 41234