Health and Wellness

Herbal and natural remedies and wellness.

Review: Shaolin Qi Gong, by Shi Xinggui and Eleonore Vogl

By Gesigewigu's | January 16, 2009 | Leave a comment

Shaolin Qi Gong: Energy in Motion, by Shi Xinggui and Eleonore Vogl
Destiny Books, 9781594772641, 151 pp, 2008

Qi Gong is an ancient Chinese form of exercise for both the body and the spirit, having roots back as far as three to five thousand years in our past. This book unfortunately does not touch too much on what makes Shaolin Qi Gong different than other forms of Qi Gong, but does explain that this system draws a difference between Hard Qi Gong, the more physical and martial forms and usage, and Soft Qi Gong, the internal, energetic form with more of a focus on healing and support. This book and the included DVD focus on Continue reading


Review: Sacred Land, by Clea Danaan

By Psyche | November 17, 2007 | 1 comment

Sacred Land: Intuitive Gardening for Personal, Political and Environmental Change, by Clea Danaan
Llewellyn Worldwide, 9780738711461, 266 pp. (incl. end notes appendix, sources and index), 2004

Last year was the first I attempted to grow anything in our vegetable garden. I knew I wanted to grow organic, but I went in more or less blind. It wasn’t a raging success, but we did get a few peppers and tomatoes. This is the book I wish I had read prior to starting my garden, unfortunately it wasn’t published then, but, lucky you, it’s out now. Continue reading


Review: Fast Food Nation, by Eric Schlosser

By Psyche | May 10, 2004 | Leave a comment

Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal, by Eric Schlosser
HarperCollins, 0060938455, 383 pp. (incl. photo credits, notes, bibliography, acknowledgements, and index.), 2001, 2002

Fast Food Nation is not for the faint of heart with its horrifying depictions of livestock farms, slaughterhouses, the fast food restaurants and school cafeterias so many of us come into contact with, utterly blind.

Schlosser takes the blinds off the utter lack of respect for human and animal rights efficiently and devastatingly, with personal stories and anecdotes from around the world. Harassment, theft, intimidation, lawsuits without an end in sight.

One assumes with any book like this that animal rights issues will crop up, but these – cruelty to the livestock with overfeeding, overcrowding – are only the tip of the iceberg. Seemingly far worse, and more personally devastating, are the gruesome working conditions of the employees. Slave wages, injury without compensation, blatant harassment, and the sanitation conditions of the slaughterhouses, restaurants, and cafeteria are obscene. Suffice to say, I’m glad I was a vegetarian long before reading the book.

Yet despite all this, Schlosser remains positive, believing that that one day ‘people can be fed without being fattened or deceived’ Perhaps even a little over-optimistic, he hopes that ‘this new century may bring an impatience with conformity, a refusal to be kept in the dark, less greed, more compassion, less speed, more common sense, a sense of humor about brand essences and loyalties, a view of food as more than just fuel. Things don’t have to be the way they are’.

Meticulously researched with a massive sixty-three page detailed notes section, Schlosser’s work is quite impressive. Often horrifying, but always educational Fast Food Nation is an absolute must read for all.


Review: Incense, by Carl F. Neal

By Psyche | March 10, 2004 | Leave a comment

Incense: Crafting and Use of Magickal Scents, by Carl F. Neal
Llewellyn Worldwide, 0738703362, 149 pp. (incl. appendices, glossary, bibliography and index), 2003

In the introduction Neal lets the reader know that this will be a different sort of book, noting that it is not intended to make large quantities of incense, or incense for commercial purposes, as these often use synthetic materials. Neal prefers a more personal and natural approach to incense making. Incense covers a variety of techniques including stick, joss, cone and loose incense making, completely naturally. You won’t find any synthetic or dipped incense recipes in this book, and, if you’ll forgive the pun, it’s a breath of fresh air.

Brief histories of incense making around the world are given, acknowledging different philosophies and traditions. Also noting that many so-called ‘traditional’ recipes may only go back 10-20 years, and while still useful, may not really be historically accurate, but reminds the reader that this doesn’t diminish their wonderful scent. He also gets into various incense philosophies, the ethics of incense making, for example whether or not to use animal material (he advises not), rare poached plants, possible attempts at fraud by merchants of incense materials, etc.

Neal discusses the possible dangers of synthetic based dipped incenses, the possible toxins and harmful effects, as well as the dangers of saltpetre found in most commercial charcoals, and why he prefers to use more natural materials. He seems to have a special reverence for Japanese incense making techniques, philosophies and practices, and several are detailed within.

A variety of recipes are offered, including numerous ‘traditional’ scents, and ritual-specific recipes such as ‘Sanctification’, ‘Handfasting’ and even ‘Happy Cats’, followed by a chapter on experimentation, which he encourages, whereas some other books don’t mention or avoid for fear of making something ‘dangerous’, but without the use of saltpetre, as Neal advises, this is unlikely to be a problem.

Advises making nice smelling incense, but also notes that one might want to ‘make incense that does not create a pleasing scent, strictly because of the magickal alignment of the materials’ (pg 40-41), or perhaps ‘if you’re a prankster, you’ll even find that your incense making skills can be used to create some pretty terrible smells’ – though he does note that no recipes of this type can be found in this book.

Wonderful as it is, I do have a few criticisms. There are a few typos, and it often gets repetitive in parts; indeed, there is even a small section that is repeated in its entirety. While there are a few pictures, step-by-step illustrations to go along with the text, though detailed, would have been appreciated, as not everyone will be able to visualize the steps clearly, especially those who have never made incense before. Appendix B lists numerous suppliers in the United States, with a handful in the UK, but none in Canada. It would be nice if, in future editions, the appendix branched out a bit to include more locals.

Very easy to use, Incense offers step-by-step instructions on how to acquire tools, materials and various incense burners. This is an excellent book for those with an interesting in incense making or who are just starting out, and as Neal notes, even if you don’t end up making your own incense, you’ll have a much better idea of what goes into the process and which things to consider when purchasing off the shelf at your local shop.


Monsters and Magical Sticks, by Steven Heller & Terry Steele

By Psyche | January 4, 2004 | Leave a comment

Monsters and Magical Sticks, by Steven Heller & Terry SteeleMonsters and Magical Sticks: Or, There’s No Such Thing As Hypnosis, by Steven Heller, Ph. D. & Terry Steele, introduction by Robert Anton Wilson
New Falcon Publication, 1561840262, 191 (Incl. bibliography), 1987, 2001

Prior to reading Monsters and Magical Sticks, I didn’t know much about hypnosis, it wasn’t a subject that was really ‘on my radar’. Sure, I’d seen it used as a tool for entertainment at a few shows, where a hypnotist stood up in front of a crowd, selected a few individuals and ‘made’ them do silly things. Beyond hearing about it in reference to quitting smoking on the radio, I never really considered that it may have real, practical applications. I simply did not understand the potential therapeutic aspects, nor did I realize that I’d experienced a version of it nearly every day. Continue reading


Page 2 of 3123