Fiction and Literature

Occult fiction, poetry, and literary criticism.

God’s Debris, by Scott Adams

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God's Debris, by Scott Adams God’s Debris: A Thought Experiment, by Scott Adams
Andrews McMeel Publishing, 07407219089, 2001, 132 pp.

This is one of those books that attempts to make you think and to bring up ideas and ways of thought through the medium of a carefully crafted novel. It reminds me of such books as Illusions by Robert Bach or The Way of the Peaceful Warrior by Dan Millman which also lay down their ideas through the medium of a novel rather than directly addressing them in a traditional manner. Continue reading


Review: From the Ashes, by Meghan Brunner

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From the Ashes, by Meghan Brunner
First Books, 0759681708, 544 pages (+ glossary and character listing), 2002

Although I’m not a Ren Faire goer myself, being chronically cash-strapped, this book rang very true for me. The differences between a week-long Pagan gathering and a Ren Faire are not that great. I felt, immediately, like I knew these characters.

There were minor typographical errors (missing words, some irregular spacing, and such) but nothing major enough to detract from my enjoyment of Meghan’s crisp and vivid writing style.

By the time I was a quarter of the way through the book I had one major regret – that I only had another 390 pages to go. I already knew that I was going to want more (which is why I am glad to see that this is only the start of a series).

The characters are very vivid and have rapidly become like members of my extended family. I will miss them while I wait for the next instalment in this wonderful series of books.

This is not a children’s fantasy book. It is set firmly in the real world and deals with real-life issues such as sexuality, jealousy, power trips and more. It is not blatantly sexual, but it does not shy away from the topic either.

Although it has Pagan/magickal themes running through it, it is a book, and a series, which should be thoroughly enjoyed by a wide cross section of readers. One does not need a working knowledge of Paganism or magick to understand it. More mundane readers will simply enjoy the stories of personal interaction and growth which a major part of this wonderful book.

The development of characters and plot-lines is very smooth and vivid, and makes the images come alive. I have seldom read a book where I developed an understanding and empathy for the characters as quickly as I did with these people.

Ryna and Phoenix are meant for each other, but neither is sure the other shares those feelings. In the manner of all lovers, they stumble through the opening phases of what each hopes will be a life-long commitment. They brave dangers for each other, often from a single enemy shared though the centuries. They find happiness, share the fear of loss, and find themselves part of a family which offers love and support unconditionally – something Phoenix has looked for all her life. Along the way, as often happens with lovers, they spread their happiness through their circle of friends and acquaintances unconsciously.

Not to give away secrets or spoil anything, I must say that the “initiation” ceremony near the end of the book is profoundly moving, and I wish I could have taken part in it myself.

If you want a fun read, something to take your mind off day-to-day mundania, the price of this book is money well spent. On top of that, the book is available in a variety of formats (Electronic – ISBN 0-7596-8169-4; Rocket – ISBN 0-7596-8172-4; Softcover ISBN 0-7596-8170-8; and Hardcover ISBN 0-7596-8171-6). So, choose how you want the book, then go to www.1stbooks.com and order your copy today.


The Little Book of Vegan Poems, by Benjamin Zephaniah

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The Little Book of Vegan Poems, by Benjamin Zephaniah
AK Press, 1902593332, 2000

The Little Book of Vegan Poems, aimed at both children and adults, begins with a compilation of definitions from various dictionaries and encyclopedias before moving into the poetry. This little book has it all: veganism, animal rights, nature, limericks, hell, even vegan erotic poetry – some cute, some vaguely disturbing, many nonsensical, all eco-friendly, makes me wonder if this book was printed on recycled paper.

There’s a warning to meat eaters on the back and inside that the poetry might offend them, but the poem “Eat Your Words” ((p. 30)) pretty much sums it up with “And vegetarian poets / Make me nervous quite a lot.”  Continue reading


Review: Cosmic Banditos, by A. C. Weisbecker

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Cosmic Banditos, by A. C. Weisbecker
New American Library, 0451203062, 1986, 2001

Mexican drug dealers, quantum physics, and the pursuit of enlightenment through obscurity with a cast of many interesting and bizarre characters.

This edition comes with a forward by the author, which is interesting in and of itself, but would probably make more sense had you read the book beforehand – as it is with most forwards in works of fiction.

The plot mainly surrounds around three main characters. On whose name you never learn, though he goes by ‘Mr. Quark’ in messages to Tina’s father. You also meet Jose, the Bandito, became Drug Lord, exiled Drug Lord, thusly back to Bandito, then back to Drug Lord; he doesn’t speak English. And High Pockets, ‘Mr. Quark’s’ dog – he doesn’t understand Spanish, he likes the bitches though.

Rollin’ high times and good fun, this is on my list of books to recommend to people during especially mundane times in addition to the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, Principia Discordia, Illusions and similar great works of literature.

“When all is said and done, when all the shouting and philosophizing and moralizing is over, I suspect that this tale is simply another example of something.”


Review: The Illuminatus! Trilogy, by Robert Shea and Robert Anton Wilson (2)

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The Illuminatus! Trilogy: The Eye in the Pyramid, The Golden Apple, Leviathan, by Robert Shea and Robert Anton Wilson
Dell, 0440539811 816 p.

It’s a classic. That’s what everybody says about it. It’s got style, class, and a very neat way of fucking up your head. It jumps, changes, moves, twists and turns all the way through until you’re no longer sure what the plot is, or why you’re even trying to follow it any more.

It plays games with you. It entices you in by being all cute and cuddly and voluptuous and entertaining and then [wap] it beats you over the head with a wet penguin from mars to break your complacency.

Pay attention. It’s fun, but there’s an undercurrent of seriousness in the gameplay that you’ll be able to pick out if you pay attention.

Four and a half wet fishes out of three.


The Illuminatus! Trilogy, by Robert Anton Wilson

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The Illuminatus! Trilogy, by Robert Anton WilsonThe Illuminatus! Trilogy, by Robert Shea and Robert Anton WilsonThe Illuminatus! Trilogy: The Eye in the Pyramid, The Golden Apple, Leviathan, by Robert Shea and Robert Anton Wilson
Dell, 0440539811, 816 p.

Robert Shea and Robert Anton Wilson combine a multitude of conspiracy theories, ’60s hippy culture with a conservative twist, and an odd writing style intended to cause the reader to incidentally deconstruct their ego by blurring the distinction between whose perspective they’re writing from. There’s a bit of required reading; if you don’t know much about Freud and Carl Jung, and the occult, for example, you’ll miss out a lot of what is said in the book. Starts losing pace about half-way through and ends in a whimper. Continue reading


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